Fall 2013 Internship Class Podcasts (coordinated by Ross Larkin and Jessica Taylor): Life in the Panama Canal Zone, World War II, LGBT Life in the South, Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and more

Published: April 11th, 2014

Category: SPOHP Podcasts

Fall 2013 interns produced podcasts on a variety of topics. Image from the Peace Corps.

University of Florida Digital Collections Archive

march 2014 ufdcTo date, 50+ oral history podcasts are available on the University of Florida’s Digital Collections website, including final projects for the entire Spring 2011, 2013, Fall 2013, and Spring 2014 intern classes, as well as the Summer 2013 seminar and original SPOHP podcast series, released in 2009. Browse the following highlights for more information, and visit the UFDC to download the many available series.

To access information about individual podcasts, scroll through the UFDC collection. Podcasts below are from the Fall 2013 internship class. All podcasts are 15 minutes or less to facilitate easy access to local history for students, teachers, and the general public.

Lawrence Goodwyn: Bringing the Ancient City Up To Speed: St. Augustine’s Civil Rights Movement (created by Asli Karaevli) 10:13

Duke University professor and oral historian Lawrence Goodwyn discusses the civil rights movement in St. Augustine. Topics include Florida’s “separatist white supremist state policy,” civil rights leader Dr. Robert Hayling, collusion between city police and the Ku Klux Klan’s St. Augustine branch, the “Ancient City Gun Club,” and the violence that ensued. Edited by Asli Karaevli.

Joel Buchanan: Integration at Gainesville High School (created by Chelsea Carnes) 9:55

Joel Buchanan, a longtime Gainesville resident and noted local historian, reflects on the circumstances and experiences of his high school education, when he participated in public school desegregation by being among one of the first students to integrate Gainesville High School. Edited by Chelsea Carnes.

Tim Dalrymple, Tom Mirti, and Amy Panikowski: Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (created by Christine Troskey) 8:54

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers Tim Dalrymple (Botswana), Tom Mirti (Mali), and Amy Panikowski (Malawi) reflect on their two years of Peace Corps service and the goals of the organization. Edited by Christine Troskey.

Tripp Pomeroy, Monika Firl, and Paul Ortiz: Fair Trade Coffee (created by Emily Snyder) 10:43

Tripp Pomeroy, Monika Firl, and Dr. Paul Ortiz shed light on the fair trade coffee movement. Pomeroy discusses the purposes and mechanics behind fair trade cooperatives, the origins of the coffee importing cooperative, Cooperative Coffees, and the implications fair trade has on consumer awareness, Firl explores how mass certification efforts erode that awareness and dull efforts to connect producers and consumers, and Ortiz favorably compares the fair trade movement with anti-slavery movement boycotts. Edited by Emily Snyder.

Neidi Dominguez: Undocumented Immigrants in Higher Education (created by Farah Khan) 8:30

Harvey Adams, born in Pittsburgh in 1929, was an Army cadet, police chief, civil rights activist, and lecturer. In this podcast, he recounts a few of his experiences with race and civil service throughout his career. Adams describes being subjected to segregation on Southern trains and the loss of respect his white friend showed him for accepting it, “the customs” of the South used to justify segregation even on Federally-owned military bases, and his experiences with the Pittsburgh police and the “Black Guardians,” an advocacy group for black police officers. Edited by Farah Khan.

Harvey Adams in the Military and Police (created by Jackson Loop) 9:35

Harvey Adams, born in Pittsburgh in 1929, was an Army cadet, police chief, civil rights activist, and lecturer. In this podcast, he recounts a few of his experiences with race and civil service throughout his career. Adams describes being subjected to segregation on Southern trains and the loss of respect his white friend showed him for accepting it, “the customs” of the South used to justify segregation even on Federally-owned military bases, and his experiences with the Pittsburgh police and the “Black Guardians,” an advocacy group for black police officers. Edited by Jackson Loop.

Russel Bowen and Janice Scott: Panama Canal Zone 1964 Riots and Transition (created by Helen Miney) 9:49

In January 1964, tensions between Panamanians and American Canal Zone residents were at an all-time high. In the midst of this, Panamanian and American student demonstrators sparked a riot by clashing over the flying of their respective flags at Balboa High School. Both Russel Bowen and Janice Scott were residents of Balboa, and in this podcast they share their experiences under martial law as well as their impressions of Canal Zone relations and conditions during and since the 1964 riots. Edited by Helen Miney.

B.L. Burton and Ralph Todd: The Invasion of Normandy (created by Irfaan Hafeez) 8:25

B.L. Burton, Army Air Corps radio operator, and Ralph Todd, Army ammunition company officer, describe their experiences in the lead up to and during the D-Day Invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. Edited by Irfaan Hafeez.

Merrill Mushroom: The Womonwrites Southeast Lesbian Writers Conference (created by Jennifer Ortiz) 11:01

Merrill Mushroom describes her life as a lesbian feminist activist and the origins and history of the Womonwrites Southeast Lesbian Writers Conference. Mushroom touches on the systemic yet subtle use of sexist, racist, and otherwise oppressive language in popular culture, before moving on to the history of the Womonwrites Conference, an inclusive, leaderless collection of workshops, affinity groups, and open readings that meets annually in both the Spring and Fall. Edited by Jennifer Ortiz.

Herbert Pepper and Conrad Alberty: The Bataan Death March (created by Nicole de Almeida) 10:13

American Pacific Theater veterans Herbert Pepper and Conrad Alberty share their experiences as Japanese prisoners of war during and after the Bataan Death March of 1942, including their vivid memories of the harsh conditions and violent deaths suffered during the march as well as during their time interred in a Japanese POW camp. Edited by Nicole de Almeida.

For more information about the podcast series, University of Florida Digital Collections, and more, please contact the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program.

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