Spring 2013 Internship Class Podcasts: LGBT Life in Florida, Race in America’s Armed Forces, Disability History, World War II, Integrating the University of Florida, Female War Veterans

Published: April 11th, 2014

Category: SPOHP Podcasts

Spring 2013 seminar students produced podcasts on a variety of topics. Featured image of Doris “Dorie” Miller, a cook in the United States Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the U.S. Navy at the time. Image from the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

University of Florida Digital Collections Archive

march 2014 ufdcTo date, 50+ oral history podcasts are available on the University of Florida’s Digital Collections website, including final projects for the entire Spring 2011, 2013, Fall 2013, and Spring 2014 intern classes, as well as the Summer 2013 seminar and original SPOHP podcast series, released in 2009. Browse the following highlights for more information, and visit the UFDC to download the many available series.

To access information about individual podcasts, scroll through the UFDC collection. Podcasts below are from the Spring 2013 internship class. All podcasts are 15 minutes or less to facilitate easy access to local history for students, teachers, and the general public.

Fred Pratt: Minority Relations: LGBT Florida (created by Sabrina Mijares) 10:00

This podcast explores the issues of identity and representation that minorities face. The focus is on the LGBT community in Florida, specifically the views of Fred Pratt: a man who is a part of both the disabled and gay communities. Podcast edited by Sabrina Mijares.

Richard Williams: World War II Veteran on War and Life After War (created by Kenneth Bain) 10:30

This podcast is about the experiences of an army field medic during WWII. It talks about traveling, life as a medic, camaraderie, and dealing with life after the war. Edited by Kenneth Bain.

Stephan Mickle and Evelyn Marie Moore Mickle: Integrating the University of Florida (created by Emily Nyren and Kimberly Withum) 8:33

This podcast explores the value of diversity at the University of Florida in Gainesville and the challenges facing the first African American students who integrated to integrate the college. Edited by Emily Nyren and Kimberly Withum.

Grant Roberts: Race and America’s Armed Forces (created by Zoe Beiner) 11:06

Grant Roberts describes his experiences in the U.S. military. Roberts enlisted in 1952, shortly after the army’s integration in 1947. He served in the air force for over 20 years, including during the Korean War. Roberts’s interview focuses on race relations during his time training, serving abroad and in the U.S. as well as life after the military. Edited by Zoe Beiner.

Mary Bahr: Female War Veterans’ Often Uncovered Story (created by Toni-Lee Maitland and Giovanni Noguera) 8:22

Vietnam War veteran Mary Bahr recounts her experiences as an Intelligence Officer during the war. She witnessed pain, suffering, and destitution in Vietnam, all while combating sexism present in a male-dominated field. Edited by Toni-Lee Maitland and Giovanni Noguera.

Conrad Alberty and John R. Bumgarner: The Forgotten Front, Atrocities in the Pacific during World War II  (created by Jordan Vaal and Ilija Zdravkovic) 9:31

This podcast focuses on two World War II veterans: Conrad Alberty and John Bumgarner, who served the U.S. military in the Pacific Theatre. Both were eventually captured by the Japanese and spent time as prisoners of war. In addition to their recollection of their service, they discuss how the conflict in Europe overshadowed the Pacific, and how the intense and violent nature of the Pacific Theatre is still widely unknown today. Edited by Jordan Vaal and Ilija Zdravkovic.

For more information about the podcast series, University of Florida Digital Collections, and more, please contact the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program .

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