Intersections Grant Awarded!

Dr. Paul Ortiz and SPOHP will take part in developing UF undergrad courses on Intersections of Global Blackness and Latinx Identity through an Intersections Research-Into-Teaching Grant from the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere & Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This Intersections group will emphasize how popular culture, visual arts, and performance reverberate globally through media consumption to (re)produce Black & Latinx cultures. Illustration by Rafael López for Margarita Engle’s Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music.

“Puerto Ricans find new home in Alachua County”

“Marta Rivera felt uneasy a few weeks ago when she arrived at Pugh Hall on the University of Florida campus. She was there to watch, for the first time, a five-minute oral history video made by students about her decision to flee Puerto Rico and settle in Gainesville after Hurricane Maria. She would later say she was more nervous at the viewing of the video than she was when UF students interviewed her for the class project months ago. Rivera, 70, shared her story with students as part of a Spanish Service Learning class project. The interview will be archived as part of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, a mission of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.”

http://www.gainesville.com/news/20180505/puerto-ricans-find-new-home-in-alachua-county

 

Laura Dixie: Remembering a ‘Mother of the Movement’

Laura Mae Dixie, known as “the Mother of the Movement in Tallahassee, Florida,” passed away last month at the age of 92. Her life is a testament to the oft-forgotten role of African-American working-class people — especially women — in the making of the modern civil rights movement in the South. (Photo by Deborah Hendrix.)

Facing South has published our essay on Mrs. Laura Dixie. Known as “the Mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” in Tallahassee, Florida, Laura Dixie was one of the most important organizers in the rise of the modern civil rights movement in the Deep South in the 1950s. She was a lead organizer in the historic Tallahassee Bus Boycott in 1956; played a pivotal role in the FAMU sit-in movement in the 1960s; was responsible for a massive voter registration campaign in the Panhandle in the 1970s; marched against the Ku Klux Klan in Forsyth, Georgia in the 1980s; was a founding president of her hospital workers union–and even all of these listed activities barely scratches the surface of the importance of her life. For the Proctor Program, Mrs. Dixie has hosted us for barbecues, fish-fries and stop-overs during our annual Mississippi Freedom Project field trips–as well as other events for a decade. SPOHP will continue to honor the memory of this amazing person who has done so much for the nation as well as SPOHP.

Read our essay published in Facing South titled “Laura Dixie: Remembering a ‘Mother of the Movement'” here now!

 

 

 

Telling Gainesville: A Film Screening

Please join military veterans and their families for a special Veterans Day film screening of the play “Telling Gainesville.” Telling Gainesville is part of a nationwide initiative by the National Endowment for the Humanities that connects civilian audiences with veterans in a creative, supportive environment.

“Telling Gainesville” ran to standing-room- only audiences at the Actor’s Warehouse in the fall of 2016. It featured veterans from the Marine Corps, the US Navy, and the Army—along with a woman who was married to an Air Force pilot for twenty years. The play allowed veterans tell their stories in the first person, and to speak directly with audiences about the challenges of military service in war and in peace.

The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s videographer, Deborah Hendrix, filmed one of the final performances of Telling Gainesville. The film captures the poignancy of veterans discussing combat experiences, loss of comrades, and post-war traumas. After the film screening, the play’s director, Jeffrey Pufahl, will hold a roundtable discussion with actor-veterans who will take questions from the audience. Jeffrey Pufahl is a Creative Campus Visiting Scholar in Residence at the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and a faculty member in UF’s Center for Arts in Medicine.

This screening is part of ongoing efforts by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Florida Humanities Council to create and support works that bring together civilians and veterans in mutually supportive dialogues to promote understanding. The play was written by Max Reyneard and directed by Jeffrey Pufahl.

The program is part of the University of Florida’s, “Dialogues on the Experiences of War” and is sponsored by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) Veterans’ History Project and the Center for European Studies, along with the UF Center for Arts in Medicine.

This program has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as the Florida
Humanities Council.

EVENT: Telling Gainesville: Military Veterans Share Their Stories of Service and Struggle
LOCATION: The Hippodrome State Theatre, Downtown, Gainesville
DATE: Saturday, November 11th
TIME: Doors 6:30, Screening 7:00pm – 9:00pm.

Free Public Event

 

About the Dialogues on the Experience of War program:

The NEH offers the Dialogues on the Experience of War program as part of its current initiative, Standing Together: The Humanities and the Experience of War. The program supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. If you are interested in future discussion sessions or film screenings, contact Lisa Booth at the UF Center for European Studies.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Lisa Booth
Center for European Studies
Email Lisa Booth for more information and free discussion materials.

Tamarra Jenkins
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program
352-392- 7168

Voices from the March: A Multi-Media Experience

On January 27th, our Fall interns and staff will be performing an original multi-media play titled Voices from the March at the 2018 UF Social Justice Summit. A collaboration between the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and the Center for Women’s Studies, this verbatim theater piece compiles oral history narratives from the Women’s March on Washington as well the experiences of the students who documented those voices. Voices from the March was directed by SPOHP Scholar in Residence Jeffrey Pufahl whose work at the University of Florida is focused on creating inter-campus and inter-community partnerships to develop theatre-based programming that addresses social issues and community health. The 2018 Summit theme is “Allyship: Identify, Interact, & Impact.” The Summit agenda includes outstanding programs from community members, students, and scholars across many disciplines. Visit the UF Social Justice Summit: For the Gator Good page for more information about this excellent event.

Dates and Locations

 

January 27th, 4:30 PM

J. Wayne Reitz Student Union in the Rion Ballroom

FREE and open to the public

 

Visit the “Voices from the March” information page on the Social Justice Summit website

 

SPOHP is Seeking Out Undocumented UF Students for an Oral History Project

SPOHP is looking for undocumented UF students to be interviewed for an oral history project. Please share with anyone who might be interested in participating.

For more information direct message us or email:
Mariana Castro
or
Dr. Ryan Morini
or
Visit SPOHP on the 2nd Floor of Pugh Hall.

Farmworkers Irma Relief

Gainesville residents and UF community: there are ways to help the Immokalee community by dropping off goods at multiple on-campus locations. Items will be transported to Immokalee first on September 23, and then again in two weeks. #HurricaneIrmaRelief

A list of items includes:

  • Charcoal
  • Lighters
  • Diapers
  • Baby wipes
  • Bug spray
  • Underwear
  • Socks
  • Tarps
  • Non-perishable or canned foods
  • Feminine hygiene products

Drop-off locations and times include:

UF Graduate Assistants United Office – Yon 224 Tuesday 2-5PM and Wednesday & Thursday from 1:30 to 3:30 PM.

University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies – Grinter Hall 319, 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 1:00PM to 5:00 PM

Center for African Studies at the University of Florida (MDP Office) – Grinter 470 from 9 AM to 5 PM

La Salita in the UF J. Wayne Reitz Union UF Multicultural & Diversity Affairs from 9 AM to 7 PM

Florida Queer History: A Pride Extravaganza

The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP)’s Florida Queer History Project is partnering with First Magnitude Brewing Company to bring you “A Pride Extravaganza” on October 15!

The event will serve as a fundraiser for SPOHP’s Florida Queer History Project, which will be exhibiting a portrait and oral history interview series from their June 2017 research trip to document Pride weekend in Washington, DC. We will be hosting a resource fair with local organizations and LGBTQ+ community allies from 3-5PM. There will be live music from Gutless, Bird Eat Bird, and drag performances by Mx Bubbles, Rose Chamellion, Salí de la Rosa, and Elena La Fuega from 5-7PM.

Wristbands and tickets are available for presale and will be available at the door. Tickets can be redeemed for a free beer at the event, and wristbands allow attendees to get fifty cents off every beer purchase. Presale items can be purchased in the SPOHP office on the second floor of Pugh Hall from office manager Tamarra Jenkins.

Presale:
$10/ $11: wristband & beer ticket
$12+: wristband, beer, & a Florida Queer History zine at the event

Door:
$12: wristband & beer ticket
$13+: wristband, beer, & a Florida Queer History zine at the event

Thanks to our wonderful co-sponsors, UF Center for Gender, Sexualities, and Women’s Studies Research, Pride Community Center, Neutral7 design group, Hardback Cafe, Gainesville Girls Rock Camp, and First Magnitude Brewing Company!

The event is part of the Pride Community Center’s “Pride Days.” Any local organizations interested in participating in the resource fair can reach out to Florida Queer History Coordinators Holland Hall or Robert Baez.

For questions, please contact our office at:
(352) 392-3261 or Tamarra Jenkins.

Mississippi Freedom Fieldwork Panel Sept. 27

Mississippi Freedom Fieldwork Panel Presentation

Ustler Hall

Wednesday, Sept. 27th

3:00 PM

On Wednesday the 27th the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program will host a panel of students to discuss their experience interviewing in Mississippi. This panel celebrates SPOHP’s 10th year of sending students out to the Mississippi Delta region to interview those involved in the Black freedom struggle and the Civil Rights movement. Students interviewed people as diverse as a leader of a hot rod club that secretly helped people escape from the KKK, Congressman John Lewis, and the first Black nurse practitioner in Mississippi. They also met with the descendants of plantation aristocracy who are going to allow UF to scan their family’s slave ledger that they have never shown before.

The event will also be live-streamed via our Facebook page.
This event is free and open to the public. Bring a friend or tune in!

“Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.”

We wanted to share a sheet that the directors of the IC-Race (Immigration, Critical Race and Cultural Equity) Lab at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Drs. Nayeli Y. Chavez- Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames developed, “Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.” Please share widely with anyone who may benefit from this toolkit; the mental health of DREAMers matters.

Click here for access to this document.