SPOHP Director Dr. Paul Ortiz is teaching a course this spring on oral history!

This interdisciplinary seminar is an intensive introduction to the
theory and practice of oral history. Students will have access to the
resources of the award-winning Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. We
will learn the craft of oral history interviewing and digital
production. We will study the burgeoning impact of oral history in human
rights and racial truth and reconciliation initiatives, social justice
documentaries, digital archives, public museums, other contexts. We will
cover a wide range of debates including the paradox of memory, the role
of nation, class, gender, genocide, and racial inequalities in shaping
memories. Students will be able to use the skills learned in this class
in order to become more effective interviewers, digital producers and
writers in various fields including history, journalism, film, radio, as
well as ethnography. Case studies will include oral history methods in
US, Latin American, European, and African histories and texts.

September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Pugh Hall – Ocora

296 Buckman Drive, Gainesville FL 32611

Watch on Streaming and On Demand link at:

Mediasite website

Welcoming Gainesville and Alachua County and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are holding a public event titled “Home Away from Home: Remembering Refugees in Florida” on September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm at Pugh Hall Ocora (296 Buckman Drive Gainesville FL 32611). The event will feature the oral history of refugees in Jacksonville, Florida, collected by Seyeon Hwang, a doctoral student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida, and various state-wide and national efforts in refugee advocacy, followed by a talk-back session with refugees and refugee resettlement professionals from Florida.

This event is supported by the Florida Humanities Council and the public is encouraged to attend the event. Light refreshment will be served.

For more information on the oral history project in Jacksonville or the event, please visit contact Grace Chun or visit Refugee oral history website.

Visit our Eventbrite page.

This event is free and open to the public.

Our students just got back from another successful and exciting trip doing oral history fieldwork in the Mississippi Delta as part of our Mississippi Freedom Project!

The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi.

We will be continuing our Mississippi Freedom Project this Summer to travel to the Mississippi Delta for our annual fieldwork trip July 15th – 22nd. The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi. This year, students participating in our fieldwork trip will engage in the following projects:

  • Conducting interviews in Gadsden County and Tallahassee
  • Conducting interviews with Equal Justice Initiative Staff
  • Tour Legacy Museum & Lynching Memorial
  • Conducting interviews at the Southern Poverty Law Center
  • Day of Service at Colored Cemetery
  • Participating in a Civil Rights Panel

For more information about the trip, check out, http://oral.history.ufl.edu/projects/mfp/ or contact the project coordinator, Nicole Yapp, at nyapp@ufl.edu.

Fieldwork Goals:

  • Conduct oral history fieldwork with community members and former civil rights activists
  • Engage in scholarship about grassroots freedom movements
  • Involvement in a public panel
  • Participate in service day activities with community organizations

Summer B 2018, July 2 – August 10
AMH 3593: Introduction to Oral History

Course Overview

This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of oral history. Oral history is an important methodological approach to documenting the past which allows historians to engage directly with narrators who share their life experiences touching on any number of themes and topics. It is an easily accessible form of history in which practically anyone can take part as either an interviewer or interviewee. Oral history projects often involve making connections with community organizations which allows for the forging of stronger connections between academia and Main Street. Accordingly, one of the biggest strengths of oral history as a methodological approach to studying the past is its public component-oral histories are often collected in a community and then shared with that community.

For our research project this summer we will be partnering with the Farmworkers’ Association of Florida (FWAF), an organization which advocates on behalf of agricultural workers in central Florida. We will be interviewing current and former farmworkers. Conducting these oral history interviews will give us the opportunity to interrogate the lived experiences of these men and women and to better understand what it means to be a worker in the agricultural industry and to understand the intersection of class, race/ethnicity, and gender in this work environment. Through these interviews we will also explores issues of environmental sustainability and the impact of pesticides and genetically modified crops on humans and the environment.

Course Goals:

  • Build foundational knowledge of oral history methodology and research use
  • Work on oral history interview processing
  • Conduct an original oral history interview
  • Gain Digital Archives & Humanities experience
  • Learn skills in different forms of visual media, podcasting and design software

 

Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. For more information contact Matt Simmons.

 

Event: Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF
Date: Friday, March 30, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: Pugh Hall – Ocora
Join us for a discussion on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and the Institute of Hispanic/Latino Cultures (La Casita), including their founding and their entwined legacies. Speakers will include Dr. David Horne (Cal State Northridge), one of the organizers of the Black Thursday protest that led to the founding of the IBC, and Dr. Maria Masque, former La Casita director (1995-1997) who actively supported efforts for awareness and engagement among the University student groups of color. Not a formal panel discussion, this is intended to be an open dialogue between these speakers and the UF community.