Ready for a Free Staycation at the Beach? Relax- SPOHP’s Here For You.

Walk along Seahorse Key beach with Steve Stancyk and John Caldwell, as well as other marine biologists, at the UF’s Seahorse Key Marine Lab. Free on SPOHP’s Youtube channel! (click image)

Check Out Our Videos on SPOHP’s YouTube Channel

For an easy way to navigate to SPOHP’s wonderful collection of videos, click on the YouTube icon in the upper righthand corner of our website. SPOHP’s YouTube channel can also be found by entering SPOHP 111 in YouTube’s search field. There are close to 400 videos posted at the moment. Enjoy!

SPOHP’s Summer Fundraiser- Please Give!

Thanks to our donors, 2017-2018 has been amazing! 

And we’re planning a busy year ahead! 

During our Summer 2018 Fundraising Campaign Please Donate Today!

Interested in gaining research experience? Fascinated by eyewitness history? We’re looking for volunteers!

The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program,which is one of the premiere oral history programs in the United States, houses over 500 oral history interviews within the African American History Project (AAHP). Join us in preparing for the unveiling of this collection, which will take place in Pugh Hall on March 21, 2019. Through participating in the processing of oral history interviews, researcher volunteers will have the opportunity to listen to oral histories and transcribe the collection for future generations.

SPOHP Scholars present at the 8th Annual National Civil Rights Conference in Mississippi, June 2018

SPOHP Undergraduate Research Coordinator Oliver Tesluma and undergraduate Political Science major, as well as SPOHP alums Assistant Professor Jessica Taylor of Virginia Tech and George Washington University doctoral student Candice Ellis, presented papers at the 8th National Civil Rights Conference, which took place on June 17-20, 2018 in Meridian and Philadelphia, Mississippi. This year’s conference theme was “Lets Rise, Advocate, Educate and Cooperate.” Their papers were presented during a panel presentation entitled, Recording Civil Rights History: the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) and the Mississippi Freedom Project.

Telsuma’s paper, “Evaluating the Effects of Oral History and Civil Rights Activism in the Mississippi Delta Since the 1950s,” incorporated research methods he learned while working with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, which, he notes, “emphasizes community collaboration and decolonized leadership structures to conduct effective and sustainable research.” Telsuma’s scholarship contextualizes information collected from the Mississippi Delta region, while evaluating elements of these research methods as organizing tools for better understanding the ways in which power structures can work alongside marginalized communities to empower them, from the Freedom Summer to the Black Lives Matter Movement.

SPOHP featured in “American Tales” article in CLAS’s Ytori Magazine

“Samuel Proctor became the first UF Historian and Archivist when he was still a PhD student. He never left the role. Proctor was heavily involved with UF, so much so that rumor told he had four or five, maybe six, offices on the campus. Now, his name prefixes one of the nation’s largest oral history programs — in a field of inquiry that he helped pioneer.”

Collecting Oral Histories from the Poarch Band of the Creek Indians

This Summer a SPOHP team of undergraduate students, graduate students, and SPOHP alumni returned to in Atmore, Alabama to conduct interviews with members of the Poarch Band of the Creek Indian Nation. Students learned the technical skills necessary to set up cameras, lighting, and audio equipment at the tribe’s archive building, as well as in homes on the nearby reservation. Unlike many eastern Indian tribes, the Poarch Creeks were not removed from their tribal lands and have lived together for almost 200 years in and around the reservation in Poarch, Alabama.

Intersections Grant Awarded!

Dr. Paul Ortiz and SPOHP will take part in developing UF undergrad courses on Intersections of Global Blackness and Latinx Identity through an Intersections Research-Into-Teaching Grant from the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere & Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This Intersections group will emphasize how popular culture, visual arts, and performance reverberate globally through media consumption to (re)produce Black & Latinx cultures. Illustration by Rafael López for Margarita Engle’s Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music.

Our Summer B Intro to Oral History Course Will Focus on FL Farmworker History

Summer B 2018, July 2 – August 10
AMH 3593: Introduction to Oral History

Course Overview

This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of oral history. Oral history is an important methodological approach to documenting the past which allows historians to engage directly with narrators who share their life experiences touching on any number of themes and topics. It is an easily accessible form of history in which practically anyone can take part as either an interviewer or interviewee. Oral history projects often involve making connections with community organizations which allows for the forging of stronger connections between academia and Main Street. Accordingly, one of the biggest strengths of oral history as a methodological approach to studying the past is its public component-oral histories are often collected in a community and then shared with that community.

For our research project this summer we will be partnering with the Farmworkers’ Association of Florida (FWAF), an organization which advocates on behalf of agricultural workers in central Florida. We will be interviewing current and former farmworkers. Conducting these oral history interviews will give us the opportunity to interrogate the lived experiences of these men and women and to better understand what it means to be a worker in the agricultural industry and to understand the intersection of class, race/ethnicity, and gender in this work environment. Through these interviews we will also explores issues of environmental sustainability and the impact of pesticides and genetically modified crops on humans and the environment.

Course Goals:

  • Build foundational knowledge of oral history methodology and research use
  • Work on oral history interview processing
  • Conduct an original oral history interview
  • Gain Digital Archives & Humanities experience
  • Learn skills in different forms of visual media, podcasting and design software

 

Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. For more information contact Matt Simmons.