Event: Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF
Date: Friday, March 30, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: Pugh Hall – Ocora
Join us for a discussion on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and the Institute of Hispanic/Latino Cultures (La Casita), including their founding and their entwined legacies. Speakers will include Dr. David Horne (Cal State Northridge), one of the organizers of the Black Thursday protest that led to the founding of the IBC, and Dr. Maria Masque, former La Casita director (1995-1997) who actively supported efforts for awareness and engagement among the University student groups of color. Not a formal panel discussion, this is intended to be an open dialogue between these speakers and the UF community.

https://vimeo.com/254959350

After headlining the 2018 UF Social Justice Summit this past January Voices from the March will be traveling to California this April to perform at the Southwest Oral History Association Annual Conference, hosted at California State University, Fullerton!

Please help us raise money to assist in covering the travel and lodging costs for our cast. We have been working so hard to bring this project to life, but we still need your support to share our work. Any donation is greatly appreciated!

Donate here!

The play is primarily based on interviews collected during last year’s presidential inauguration and the Women’s March on Washington, as well as the experiences of UF students who lead this project.  Our cast features some of the students who traveled to Washington, D.C., performing alongside other students who assist in bringing their various interviews to life. But, like our wonderful director Jeffrey Pufahl has said, “This is more than taking a play to LA, it’s about students defining who they are to the world!”

Donating to this fundraiser means that you are not only supporting this play, but you are also supporting student research and activism that is desperately needed in today’s world. This play empowers students to embrace their experiences, to use their voices in telling stories that need to be heard, and to engage in action and activism through the arts.

Our cast members hail from different corners of the UF community with varying degrees of experience performing in live theatre, making this trip to LA all the more special!

Interested in learning more about our play? Check out this article!  Watch this video! ‌

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

There have always been women, people of color, and queer folks in punk rock, both in the U.S. and throughout the wider world. Punks from countries as varied as Peru, Spain, Indonesia, Russia, and beyond have braved incarceration, religious re-education camps, and even forced disappearances in honoring the lifestyle and artistic expression that they have created spaces for through the punk scene. Punk is global, complex, and diverse.

This internship focuses on how and why people create these spaces. We will publicly archive oral history interviews to allow people of color, women, and queer punks to describe their experiences in their own words and voices. What kinds of spaces for resistance and social justice can people create when they overtly reject social norms?

SPOHP Intern Opportunities:

  • Interviewing and fieldwork methods and theory
  • Transcription and interview processing
  • Podcasting and audio editing
  • Social media and public event promotion
  • Short documentaries and video editing
  • Public and community engagement and theory

Applications are due April 16, 2018

Fall 2018 SPOHP Internship Application

For more information check out Oral history internship program, contact Associate Program Director Ryan Morini, or visit us at the SPOHP offices in Pugh Hall 247

 

Dear Friends of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program,

As you will read in this exciting end-of- year progress report, SPOHP has reached more students, scholars, and members of the general public than ever. We have conducted community-based oral history workshops with churches, businesses, university classes, veteran’s groups, African American history museums, Native American nations and much more. Thanks in large part to your generosity we have been able to provide logistical support for social-justice research projects throughout the Americas and we provided transformative and life-changing educational opportunities for hundreds of students.

In the summer of 2017 we embarked upon our 10th annual field work trip to the Mississippi Delta. In addition to interviewing legendary civil rights organizers, our team performed a day of service at the Emmett Till Museum in Glendora and sponsored public educational forums on bringing civil rights education to K-12 students in Mississippi and the South generally. Teaching students how to learn outside of the classroom is one of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s specialties. From the moment when our founder Dr. Samuel Proctor trained a cohort of graduate students to conduct oral history interviews with Native Americans in Florida, North Carolina and Alabama in the early 1970s, SPOHP’s mission has been to promote experiential learning, civic engagement, and history outside of the box—and outside of the campus. In an era of “fake news” we train interns how to conduct rigorous research. In a time of polarized debates, we show students how to listen carefully—especially to people who share diverse opinions—and we engage students in learning the age-old art of conversation. When we return from the field, we teach students the art of digital video and audio production which gives them the ability to create podcasts and documentaries on important social issues that have gained broad audiences.

Of course, none of this is possible without your support. If you like what you read in this newsletter, I hope that you will join me in helping us celebrate the 50 th year of SPOHP by making a tax-deductible donation to help sustain the work of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. In addition, if you have a friend or family member who may be so inclined, please pass this newsletter along to them. Finally, I hope that you will visit or phone us sometime in the New Year. Our students, staff and volunteers treasure the opportunity to personally share their experiences with members of the Proctor Program Family! Thank you as always for your consideration and your support.

 

Sincerely Yours,

 

Paul Ortiz

Check out our year-end journal here. 

 

 

 

Please join military veterans and their families for a special Veterans Day film screening of the play “Telling Gainesville.” Telling Gainesville is part of a nationwide initiative by the National Endowment for the Humanities that connects civilian audiences with veterans in a creative, supportive environment.

“Telling Gainesville” ran to standing-room- only audiences at the Actor’s Warehouse in the fall of 2016. It featured veterans from the Marine Corps, the US Navy, and the Army—along with a woman who was married to an Air Force pilot for twenty years. The play allowed veterans tell their stories in the first person, and to speak directly with audiences about the challenges of military service in war and in peace.

The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s videographer, Deborah Hendrix, filmed one of the final performances of Telling Gainesville. The film captures the poignancy of veterans discussing combat experiences, loss of comrades, and post-war traumas. After the film screening, the play’s director, Jeffrey Pufahl, will hold a roundtable discussion with actor-veterans who will take questions from the audience. Jeffrey Pufahl is a Creative Campus Visiting Scholar in Residence at the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and a faculty member in UF’s Center for Arts in Medicine.

This screening is part of ongoing efforts by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Florida Humanities Council to create and support works that bring together civilians and veterans in mutually supportive dialogues to promote understanding. The play was written by Max Reyneard and directed by Jeffrey Pufahl.

The program is part of the University of Florida’s, “Dialogues on the Experiences of War” and is sponsored by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) Veterans’ History Project and the Center for European Studies, along with the UF Center for Arts in Medicine.

This program has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as the Florida
Humanities Council.

EVENT: Telling Gainesville: Military Veterans Share Their Stories of Service and Struggle
LOCATION: The Hippodrome State Theatre, Downtown, Gainesville
DATE: Saturday, November 11th
TIME: Doors 6:30, Screening 7:00pm – 9:00pm.

Free Public Event

 

About the Dialogues on the Experience of War program:

The NEH offers the Dialogues on the Experience of War program as part of its current initiative, Standing Together: The Humanities and the Experience of War. The program supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. If you are interested in future discussion sessions or film screenings, contact Lisa Booth at the UF Center for European Studies.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Lisa Booth
Center for European Studies
Email Lisa Booth for more information and free discussion materials.

Tamarra Jenkins
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program
352-392- 7168

On January 27th, our Fall interns and staff will be performing an original multi-media play titled Voices from the March at the 2018 UF Social Justice Summit. A collaboration between the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and the Center for Women’s Studies, this verbatim theater piece compiles oral history narratives from the Women’s March on Washington as well the experiences of the students who documented those voices. Voices from the March was directed by SPOHP Scholar in Residence Jeffrey Pufahl whose work at the University of Florida is focused on creating inter-campus and inter-community partnerships to develop theatre-based programming that addresses social issues and community health. The 2018 Summit theme is “Allyship: Identify, Interact, & Impact.” The Summit agenda includes outstanding programs from community members, students, and scholars across many disciplines. Visit the UF Social Justice Summit: For the Gator Good page for more information about this excellent event.

Dates and Locations

 

January 27th, 4:30 PM

J. Wayne Reitz Student Union in the Rion Ballroom

FREE and open to the public

 

Visit the “Voices from the March” information page on the Social Justice Summit website

 

AFA 4931: A BLACK AND LATINXHISTORY OF THE GATOR NATION

This upcoming Spring, the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program is offering a oral history methods course course called Black and Latinx History of the Gator Nation.

Students enrolled in this course in Spring 2018 (MWF 5th) will create new archives on Black and Latinx history at UF, focusing on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture and La Casita.

In this course, students will:

  • Critically examine the history of UF as it is currently written.
  • Uncover overlooked stories in hundreds of existing interviews.
  • Apply oral history interview methods with alumni, faculty, staff.
  • Identify existing archival resources on these topics.
  • Collect and/or digitize new archival materials (photos, letters).
  • Help create a roadmap for future students to advance this work.
  • Create podcasts and teaching modules to share these stories.
  • Assist in the creation of documentaries on IBC and La Casita.

For more information on AFA 4931, section 0587,contact Dr. Ryan Morini ,
Dr. Paul Ortízat , or visit us in the SPOHP office at 248 Pugh Hall