SPOHP Director Dr. Paul Ortiz is teaching a course this spring on oral history!

This interdisciplinary seminar is an intensive introduction to the
theory and practice of oral history. Students will have access to the
resources of the award-winning Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. We
will learn the craft of oral history interviewing and digital
production. We will study the burgeoning impact of oral history in human
rights and racial truth and reconciliation initiatives, social justice
documentaries, digital archives, public museums, other contexts. We will
cover a wide range of debates including the paradox of memory, the role
of nation, class, gender, genocide, and racial inequalities in shaping
memories. Students will be able to use the skills learned in this class
in order to become more effective interviewers, digital producers and
writers in various fields including history, journalism, film, radio, as
well as ethnography. Case studies will include oral history methods in
US, Latin American, European, and African histories and texts.

Dear SPOHP’ers,

Today is a great day in the state of Florida! I’m writing to inform you
that the University of Florida Academic Senate has just voted
unanimously to award Attorney John Due the Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters.

The faculty voted unanimously in support of the nomination at the UF
Senate meeting today.

The presenters emphasized Mr. Due‘s exceptional work on behalf of human
rights and civil rights broadly, as well as the outstanding role he has
played as a mentor to countless University of Florida students!

For the past twelve years, Mr. Due has spent time with SPOHP MFP
travelers on our way to Mississippi, has visited with us in Gainesville
and he has lectured in many Levin Law seminars. I cannot begin to count
all of the students who have been inspired to become social justice,
immigrant rights, and human rights lawyers after getting the “John Due
Law Lecture.”

As many of you know, the nomination has been a two-year process, and I
am so grateful for the support that I have received from you all along
the way!

I will let you know as we learn more details in the days to come
regarding the doctoral ceremony.

Thank You,
Paul

Vietnam War Veteran and  Veterans For Peace activist Scott Camil is the subject of a new graphic novel by Eve Gilbert titled Winter Warrior. 

The book relays Camil’s life growing up in Florida in the 1960s as he was indoctrinated with anti-communist sentiment while also developing a deep seeded desire to fight for his country. After joining the marines and experiencing combat in Vietnam, he develops a new sense of purpose as a civilian and decides to dedicate his life to revealing the truth about the war.  Eve Gilbert interprets Camil’s story through Winter Warrior with striking detail and care.  Winter Warrior captures the brutal reality of the war and the bleak political reality on the domestic front. Winter Warrior recounts both the personal journey of one American and his need for political engagement when his conscience collides with American foreign policy during the height of the Cold War.

Scott Camil will be hosting a book talk this weekend at the Civic Media Center on January 11th, 2020, from 2PM-4PM.

The Civic Media Center is located downtown at 433 S. Main St.

(Parking is available on SE 5th Ave or across Main Street.)

In 2019, the University of Florida’s African American Studies Program will celebrate its 50th anniversary. The program began in 1969 and selected its first director in 1970. The late Dr. Ronald Foreman was a tireless advocate for the program from 1970 until his retirement in 2000. We will host a number of programs this year and will include information on the website. Please join us as we celebrate the education of individuals about African American life and culture for the last 50 years and our plan to continue doing so in the years to come.

The theme for the year will be “Sankofa: Building Upon the Power of the Past.” The first event will take place on Thursday, January 10th, from 6:30pm-8:30pm. The title of this event is “Honoring the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Using the Power of Spoken Word” and will be held in the Harn Museum Auditorium (3259 Hull Road). Several campus and local community artists will honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through the power of spoken word poetry.

On Saturday February 2nd at 6pm, the “Herstory” Program will take place at Flavet Field (off of Woodlawn Drive between Museum and Stadium Road). The UF Group, SISTUHS Inc., will provide moral and educational guidance to women through the theatrical presentation of the African-American Woman’s experiences. The event will showcase black women through black art, hair, music, beauty, health, fashion, and overall the Black culture and experience, with the theme “HerRoots, HerVision, HerStory.”

On Wednesday February 13th, a “Women of Color and the Law” panel discussion will take place (room tba) from 3pm-4:30pm. Attorneys Tiffani Lee, Julie Liang, and Jany Martinez-Ward will discuss their experiences as women of color in the legal profession. This event is sponsored through a grant from the Chesterfield Smith Fund at the UF Smathers Library.

On Friday, February 22nd, the annual Dr. Ronald Foreman Lecture will take place with a presentation entitled, “Women of the Black Lives Matter Movement: An Evening with Dr. Stacey Patton and Ms. Lezley McSpadden (Mother of Michael Brown).” This presentation will take place in the Rion Ballroom of the Reitz Union from 6pm-8pm.

SPOHP’s spring 2019 internship will focus on the Black Freedom Struggle in Florida, and will dovetail with our March 21-23 national symposium, From Segregation to Black Lives Matter. Students will work closely with our African American oral history interviews and other archival materials, and help us to conduct and transcribe new interviews to add to those archives and further explore some of the powerful stories they hold.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to Dr. Ryan Morini, or stop by his office in 247 Pugh Hall. Applications are due December 7, and can be found at: Oral history website.

 

The OHA’s Day of Giving last year raised money for scholarships to fund travel to the Annual OHA Conference for those in hurricane-affected areas. With matching funds provided by the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida, the OHA was able to fund 2 scholarships for travel expenses to the OHA Conference in Montreal, October 10-14. Please see the call below. Deadline to submit: September 15, 2018

Call for Applications:

The Oral History Association announces two travel scholarships for Oral Historians from Areas Affected by Hurricanes in 2017 to attend the OHA Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018.

In response to the devastation wrought by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, the Oral History Association, the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are pleased to announce two $2500 travel awards to those living or working in these affected areas for travel to the Oral History Association Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018. All travel costs to the conference will be reimbursable up to that $2500 mark.

Applications must include a letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work and a letter of support for the application.

For award purposes, we define those affected by these hurricanes to include any area damaged by high water (either from rain or from opening up reservoirs), be they individual structures, waterways, streets, or entire neighborhoods. We are looking to fund people whose particular projects fits into a more comprehensive attempt at recording or researching any of these catastrophic hurricanes.

Apply here!

Applications are due on September 15, 2018, and winners will be announced by September 30, 2018.  To submit an application: Please include a one-page letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work, and a letter of support for the application. Please combine your entire application into ONE PDF document and email it by September 15, 2018. 

September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Pugh Hall – Ocora

296 Buckman Drive, Gainesville FL 32611

Watch on Streaming and On Demand link at:

Mediasite website

Welcoming Gainesville and Alachua County and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are holding a public event titled “Home Away from Home: Remembering Refugees in Florida” on September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm at Pugh Hall Ocora (296 Buckman Drive Gainesville FL 32611). The event will feature the oral history of refugees in Jacksonville, Florida, collected by Seyeon Hwang, a doctoral student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida, and various state-wide and national efforts in refugee advocacy, followed by a talk-back session with refugees and refugee resettlement professionals from Florida.

This event is supported by the Florida Humanities Council and the public is encouraged to attend the event. Light refreshment will be served.

For more information on the oral history project in Jacksonville or the event, please visit contact Grace Chun or visit Refugee oral history website.

Visit our Eventbrite page.

This event is free and open to the public.

Our students just got back from another successful and exciting trip doing oral history fieldwork in the Mississippi Delta as part of our Mississippi Freedom Project!

The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi.

As we work diligently on our documentary project on the history of Institute of Black Culture and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Affairs, today we commemorate the one-year anniversary of Black and Brown Wednesday, a historical moment at the University of Florida.

On July 12, 2017, No La IBCita and their supporters, protested the proposal made by the Multicultural and Diversity Affairs Department (MCDA), to structurally merge the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Cultures (IHLC), La Casita, into one building. Black and Brown Wednesday is in the spirit of the continued resistance as demonstrated by people’s movements like the national Black Campus Movements, and movements that build from that legacy.

The efforts of the No La IBCita Movement produced gains, one of which led to stopping the merging of the buildings, and in turn, stopped an action that would have resulted in the erasure of history, and the homogenization of culture. However, the movement was also successful in that it has created a lasting impact and the opportunity to continue to build from these efforts. Stay tuned this week, as we commemorate NoLaIBCita’s anniversary of Freedom Friday on July 20th, by highlighting the harvests and lasting contributions that have resulted from the movement!

Posted by Chad Adonis on Wednesday, July 12, 2017