UF African American Studies Program Celebrating 50 years

In 2019, the University of Florida’s African American Studies Program will celebrate its 50th anniversary. The program began in 1969 and selected its first director in 1970. The late Dr. Ronald Foreman was a tireless advocate for the program from 1970 until his retirement in 2000. We will host a number of programs this year and will include information on the website. Please join us as we celebrate the education of individuals about African American life and culture for the last 50 years and our plan to continue doing so in the years to come.

The theme for the year will be “Sankofa: Building Upon the Power of the Past.” The first event will take place on Thursday, January 10th, from 6:30pm-8:30pm. The title of this event is “Honoring the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Using the Power of Spoken Word” and will be held in the Harn Museum Auditorium (3259 Hull Road). Several campus and local community artists will honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. through the power of spoken word poetry.

On Saturday February 2nd at 6pm, the “Herstory” Program will take place at Flavet Field (off of Woodlawn Drive between Museum and Stadium Road). The UF Group, SISTUHS Inc., will provide moral and educational guidance to women through the theatrical presentation of the African-American Woman’s experiences. The event will showcase black women through black art, hair, music, beauty, health, fashion, and overall the Black culture and experience, with the theme “HerRoots, HerVision, HerStory.”

On Wednesday February 13th, a “Women of Color and the Law” panel discussion will take place (room tba) from 3pm-4:30pm. Attorneys Tiffani Lee, Julie Liang, and Jany Martinez-Ward will discuss their experiences as women of color in the legal profession. This event is sponsored through a grant from the Chesterfield Smith Fund at the UF Smathers Library.

On Friday, February 22nd, the annual Dr. Ronald Foreman Lecture will take place with a presentation entitled, “Women of the Black Lives Matter Movement: An Evening with Dr. Stacey Patton and Ms. Lezley McSpadden (Mother of Michael Brown).” This presentation will take place in the Rion Ballroom of the Reitz Union from 6pm-8pm.

New Spring Internship on the Black Freedom Struggle in Florida

SPOHP’s spring 2019 internship will focus on the Black Freedom Struggle in Florida, and will dovetail with our March 21-23 national symposium, From Segregation to Black Lives Matter. Students will work closely with our African American oral history interviews and other archival materials, and help us to conduct and transcribe new interviews to add to those archives and further explore some of the powerful stories they hold.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to Dr. Ryan Morini, or stop by his office in 247 Pugh Hall. Applications are due December 7, and can be found at: Oral history website.

 

SPOHP Contributes Travel Support for OHA Conference Attendees from Hurricane-Affected Areas

The OHA’s Day of Giving last year raised money for scholarships to fund travel to the Annual OHA Conference for those in hurricane-affected areas. With matching funds provided by the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida, the OHA was able to fund 2 scholarships for travel expenses to the OHA Conference in Montreal, October 10-14. Please see the call below. Deadline to submit: September 15, 2018

Call for Applications:

The Oral History Association announces two travel scholarships for Oral Historians from Areas Affected by Hurricanes in 2017 to attend the OHA Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018.

In response to the devastation wrought by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, the Oral History Association, the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are pleased to announce two $2500 travel awards to those living or working in these affected areas for travel to the Oral History Association Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018. All travel costs to the conference will be reimbursable up to that $2500 mark.

Applications must include a letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work and a letter of support for the application.

For award purposes, we define those affected by these hurricanes to include any area damaged by high water (either from rain or from opening up reservoirs), be they individual structures, waterways, streets, or entire neighborhoods. We are looking to fund people whose particular projects fits into a more comprehensive attempt at recording or researching any of these catastrophic hurricanes.

Apply here!

Applications are due on September 15, 2018, and winners will be announced by September 30, 2018.  To submit an application: Please include a one-page letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work, and a letter of support for the application. Please combine your entire application into ONE PDF document and email it by September 15, 2018. 

Home Away from Home: Remembering Refugees in Florida

September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Pugh Hall – Ocora

296 Buckman Drive, Gainesville FL 32611

Watch on Streaming and On Demand link at:

Mediasite website

Welcoming Gainesville and Alachua County and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are holding a public event titled “Home Away from Home: Remembering Refugees in Florida” on September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm at Pugh Hall Ocora (296 Buckman Drive Gainesville FL 32611). The event will feature the oral history of refugees in Jacksonville, Florida, collected by Seyeon Hwang, a doctoral student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida, and various state-wide and national efforts in refugee advocacy, followed by a talk-back session with refugees and refugee resettlement professionals from Florida.

This event is supported by the Florida Humanities Council and the public is encouraged to attend the event. Light refreshment will be served.

For more information on the oral history project in Jacksonville or the event, please visit contact Grace Chun or visit Refugee oral history website.

Visit our Eventbrite page.

This event is free and open to the public.

Check Out Our Students’ Reflections On Our Annual Mississippi Freedom Trip

Our students just got back from another successful and exciting trip doing oral history fieldwork in the Mississippi Delta as part of our Mississippi Freedom Project!

The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi.

Try To Keep Up With Us! Our Summer Newsletter is Here!

We have packed this Summer 2018 edition of our newsletter Moving Right Along full of the many things that have been going on at SPOHP.

To take a look at all the amazing things SPOHP has been up to, click on:

https://spark.adobe.com/page/c8Ml7c5Rbxx7f/

Commemorating Black and Brown Wednesday

As we work diligently on our documentary project on the history of Institute of Black Culture and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Affairs, today we commemorate the one-year anniversary of Black and Brown Wednesday, a historical moment at the University of Florida.

On July 12, 2017, No La IBCita and their supporters, protested the proposal made by the Multicultural and Diversity Affairs Department (MCDA), to structurally merge the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Cultures (IHLC), La Casita, into one building. Black and Brown Wednesday is in the spirit of the continued resistance as demonstrated by people’s movements like the national Black Campus Movements, and movements that build from that legacy.

The efforts of the No La IBCita Movement produced gains, one of which led to stopping the merging of the buildings, and in turn, stopped an action that would have resulted in the erasure of history, and the homogenization of culture. However, the movement was also successful in that it has created a lasting impact and the opportunity to continue to build from these efforts. Stay tuned this week, as we commemorate NoLaIBCita’s anniversary of Freedom Friday on July 20th, by highlighting the harvests and lasting contributions that have resulted from the movement!

Posted by Chad Adonis on Wednesday, July 12, 2017

SPOHP Scholars present at National Civil Rights Conference

SPOHP Undergraduate Research Coordinator Oliver Tesluma and undergraduate Political Science major, as well as SPOHP alums Assistant Professor Jessica Taylor of Virginia Tech and George Washington University doctoral student Candice Ellis, presented papers at the 8th National Civil Rights Conference, which took place on June 17-20, 2018 in Meridian and Philadelphia, Mississippi. This year’s conference theme was “Lets Rise, Advocate, Educate and Cooperate.” Their papers were presented during a panel presentation entitled, Recording Civil Rights History: the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) and the Mississippi Freedom Project.

Telsuma’s paper, “Evaluating the Effects of Oral History and Civil Rights Activism in the Mississippi Delta Since the 1950s,” incorporated research methods he learned while working with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, which, he notes, “emphasizes community collaboration and decolonized leadership structures to conduct effective and sustainable research.” Telsuma’s scholarship contextualizes information collected from the Mississippi Delta region, while evaluating elements of these research methods as organizing tools for better understanding the ways in which power structures can work alongside marginalized communities to empower them, from the Freedom Summer to the Black Lives Matter Movement.

SPOHP featured in “American Tales” article in CLAS’s Ytori Magazine

“Samuel Proctor became the first UF Historian and Archivist when he was still a PhD student. He never left the role. Proctor was heavily involved with UF, so much so that rumor told he had four or five, maybe six, offices on the campus. Now, his name prefixes one of the nation’s largest oral history programs — in a field of inquiry that he helped pioneer.”

Intersections Grant Awarded!

Dr. Paul Ortiz and SPOHP will take part in developing UF undergrad courses on Intersections of Global Blackness and Latinx Identity through an Intersections Research-Into-Teaching Grant from the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere & Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This Intersections group will emphasize how popular culture, visual arts, and performance reverberate globally through media consumption to (re)produce Black & Latinx cultures. Illustration by Rafael López for Margarita Engle’s Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music.