SPOHP Director Dr. Paul Ortiz is teaching a course this spring on oral history!

This interdisciplinary seminar is an intensive introduction to the
theory and practice of oral history. Students will have access to the
resources of the award-winning Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. We
will learn the craft of oral history interviewing and digital
production. We will study the burgeoning impact of oral history in human
rights and racial truth and reconciliation initiatives, social justice
documentaries, digital archives, public museums, other contexts. We will
cover a wide range of debates including the paradox of memory, the role
of nation, class, gender, genocide, and racial inequalities in shaping
memories. Students will be able to use the skills learned in this class
in order to become more effective interviewers, digital producers and
writers in various fields including history, journalism, film, radio, as
well as ethnography. Case studies will include oral history methods in
US, Latin American, European, and African histories and texts.

Summer B 2018, July 2 – August 10
AMH 3593: Introduction to Oral History

Course Overview

This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of oral history. Oral history is an important methodological approach to documenting the past which allows historians to engage directly with narrators who share their life experiences touching on any number of themes and topics. It is an easily accessible form of history in which practically anyone can take part as either an interviewer or interviewee. Oral history projects often involve making connections with community organizations which allows for the forging of stronger connections between academia and Main Street. Accordingly, one of the biggest strengths of oral history as a methodological approach to studying the past is its public component-oral histories are often collected in a community and then shared with that community.

For our research project this summer we will be partnering with the Farmworkers’ Association of Florida (FWAF), an organization which advocates on behalf of agricultural workers in central Florida. We will be interviewing current and former farmworkers. Conducting these oral history interviews will give us the opportunity to interrogate the lived experiences of these men and women and to better understand what it means to be a worker in the agricultural industry and to understand the intersection of class, race/ethnicity, and gender in this work environment. Through these interviews we will also explores issues of environmental sustainability and the impact of pesticides and genetically modified crops on humans and the environment.

Course Goals:

  • Build foundational knowledge of oral history methodology and research use
  • Work on oral history interview processing
  • Conduct an original oral history interview
  • Gain Digital Archives & Humanities experience
  • Learn skills in different forms of visual media, podcasting and design software

 

Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. For more information contact Matt Simmons.

 

Event: Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF
Date: Friday, March 30, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: Pugh Hall – Ocora
Join us for a discussion on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and the Institute of Hispanic/Latino Cultures (La Casita), including their founding and their entwined legacies. Speakers will include Dr. David Horne (Cal State Northridge), one of the organizers of the Black Thursday protest that led to the founding of the IBC, and Dr. Maria Masque, former La Casita director (1995-1997) who actively supported efforts for awareness and engagement among the University student groups of color. Not a formal panel discussion, this is intended to be an open dialogue between these speakers and the UF community.

https://vimeo.com/254959350

After headlining the 2018 UF Social Justice Summit this past January Voices from the March will be traveling to California this April to perform at the Southwest Oral History Association Annual Conference, hosted at California State University, Fullerton!

Please help us raise money to assist in covering the travel and lodging costs for our cast. We have been working so hard to bring this project to life, but we still need your support to share our work. Any donation is greatly appreciated!

Donate here!

The play is primarily based on interviews collected during last year’s presidential inauguration and the Women’s March on Washington, as well as the experiences of UF students who lead this project.  Our cast features some of the students who traveled to Washington, D.C., performing alongside other students who assist in bringing their various interviews to life. But, like our wonderful director Jeffrey Pufahl has said, “This is more than taking a play to LA, it’s about students defining who they are to the world!”

Donating to this fundraiser means that you are not only supporting this play, but you are also supporting student research and activism that is desperately needed in today’s world. This play empowers students to embrace their experiences, to use their voices in telling stories that need to be heard, and to engage in action and activism through the arts.

Our cast members hail from different corners of the UF community with varying degrees of experience performing in live theatre, making this trip to LA all the more special!

Interested in learning more about our play? Check out this article!  Watch this video! ‌

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

There have always been women, people of color, and queer folks in punk rock, both in the U.S. and throughout the wider world. Punks from countries as varied as Peru, Spain, Indonesia, Russia, and beyond have braved incarceration, religious re-education camps, and even forced disappearances in honoring the lifestyle and artistic expression that they have created spaces for through the punk scene. Punk is global, complex, and diverse.

This internship focuses on how and why people create these spaces. We will publicly archive oral history interviews to allow people of color, women, and queer punks to describe their experiences in their own words and voices. What kinds of spaces for resistance and social justice can people create when they overtly reject social norms?

SPOHP Intern Opportunities:

  • Interviewing and fieldwork methods and theory
  • Transcription and interview processing
  • Podcasting and audio editing
  • Social media and public event promotion
  • Short documentaries and video editing
  • Public and community engagement and theory

Applications are due April 16, 2018

Fall 2018 SPOHP Internship Application

For more information check out Oral history internship program, contact Associate Program Director Ryan Morini, or visit us at the SPOHP offices in Pugh Hall 247

 

In the summer of 2017 SPOHP partnered with UF College of Medicine, to develop an oral history segment for the Geriatrics Medicine Clerkship, a required rotation for all 4th year medical students that Dr. Otto directs. SPOHP’s Ryan Thompson took on leadership for its half of the partnership. This marked the beginning of another significant partnership for SPOHP, one of many individual and organizational collaborations over the program’s half-century existence. Collaborations like these have proven mutually beneficial for SPOHP and its partners in professional and academic fields and beyond.