We wanted to share a sheet that the directors of the IC-Race (Immigration, Critical Race and Cultural Equity) Lab at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Drs. Nayeli Y. Chavez- Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames developed, “Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.” Please share widely with anyone who may benefit from this toolkit; the mental health of DREAMers matters.

Click here for access to this document.

September 29th from noon to 2 PM, SPOHP is hosting an Open House in the SPOHP office to welcome students and faculty alike to get acquainted with our program, staff and dozens of exciting on going projects. Visitors can expect to enjoy refreshments as they learn about SPOHP’s fieldwork, internships, and volunteer opportunities as well as our many upcoming public programs and experiential learning opportunities.

SPOHP intern Chelsey Hendry Simmons attended the Defend DACA/Save TPS Rally at Orlando City Hall. The rally was held just one hour after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Trump Administration would be rescinding DACA, the Obama-era executive order protecting over 800,000 undocumented immigrants who entered the United States as children from deportation. The rally was one of many across the nation held in solidarity with those affected by the decision. Beneficiaries of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals executive order, recipients of Temporary Protected Status, and supporters gathered to listen to speakers discuss the threatened immigration policies. Attendees discussed the uncertain future of both programs, and encouraged all to work towards a long-term solution for over one million people currently receiving DACA and TPS.

 

 

 

 

MCDA is proud to present: Anti-Racism Education Week.
Come join us as we engage in an event series on anti-racism education, self-care, and education on the first amendment. This is a great opportunity to interact with faculty, staff, and peers on how to challenge racism and bigotry on our campus and in our community.

TUESDAY 9/5: “Café con Self-Care: An interactive Panel Discussion on how to take care of ourselves in times of crisis”
5:30-7:30pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-sponsors: GatorWell, Counseling and Wellness Center

WEDNESDAY 9/6: “Our Collective Responsibility: What can we do to challenge racism on our campus and in our community?”
5:30-7pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-Sponsors: STARR (Students Taking Action Against Racism), Student Government, UF Hillel

THURSDAY 9/7: “Origins of Totalitarianism” Lecture by Dr. Paul Ortiz and post-lecture discussion
6pm-7:30pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-Sponsors: UF Hillel, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program

FRIDAY 9/8: “A Conversation on the First Amendment”
5pm-6:30pm, Rion Ballroom

An event by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
Co-sponsored by: Multicultural DIversity Affairs, the Bob Graham Center for Public Service, The Brechner Center for Freedom of Information, and the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations (Levin College of Law).

Print and/or share MCDA’s Anti-Racism Education Week program flier below:

“Since 2005, the Gainesville Latino Film Festival has featured hundreds of groundbreaking, highly acclaimed and thought-provoking films from Latin America. In 2017, our mission continues: to afford Gainesville the unique opportunity to see world-class cinema, innovative shorts, international award winners, and foster diverse experiences that link people
through the art of cinema- launching Gainesville as a cultural destination. This year’s amazing line-up includes films from Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Bolivia, Mexico, US, and Guatemala. Join us for Gainesville’s most thrilling movie event of the year!”

Check out the event page for the lineup on Facebook

The Fall 2017 Internship Application is now open!  SPOHP’s semester-long academic internship is available to graduate and undergraduate students for credit as an introduction to the field of oral history.

The Fall 2017 Social Justice Initiatives internship offers a space for students to pursue their own interests in social justice research through training and mentoring in oral history and digital humanities methodologies. Interns may develop skills in interviewing and fieldwork methods; Transcription and interview processing; Podcasting and audio editing; Social media and event promotion; Short documentaries and video editing; Public and community engagement. Final projects involve conducting one or more oral history interviews and creating digital presentation for the public.

For more information, contact the Internship Graduate Coordinator Raja Rahim. Applications are due by May 1st, 2017. Please email applications to Raja Rahim or deliver to SPOHP offices, Pugh Hall 241.

 

Beginning Thursday, March 16th, the SPOHP Radio Hour hits the airwaves DAILY at 8:00 a.m. on WUBA 88.1 FM.

Drawing from the 7,500+ interviews in the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program archive at the University of Florida, the SPOHP Radio Hour will air daily at 8 am on WUBA 88.1 FM with fascinating stories on people from all walks of life, and places and events both famous as well as hitherto hidden from history!

This week’s first installment of the SPOHP Radio Hour show explores what a “safe space” means to diverse groups of students and faculty at the University of Florida, and what influences them to create those spaces on campus. We’ll be examining what it took to create the Institute of Hispanic-Latino culture and the Institute of Black Culture at the University of Florida as well as the significance of Ethnic Studies programs today for students, staff, faculty and the public in general.

Click here to stream WUBA 88.1 FM live!

WUBA 88.1 FM is a wonderful, community-based radio station located in High Springs, Florida and covering Alachua, Gainesville, Jones, Lake City, Fort White, and soon to expand!

Enjoy the SPOHP Radio Hour at 8:00 a.m, on WUBA 88.1 FM starting this Thursday!

Please help us promote people’s stories from the Proctor Program archive by sharing this Facebook announcement link on your Scoial media outlets

Thank You!

We are excited to announce that SPOHP will be hosting the visit of Chicano slam poet Matt Sedillo during which he will be hosting two public programs on Tuesday March 28th. The first event will be a brown bag lunch with Matt Sedillo in Pugh 210 from 11:30AM to 1:00PM. The second event will be a poetry workshop held on the same day at HLA in the Office of Multicultural and Diversity Affairs (MCDA) on the second floor of the Reitz Union from 6:00PM to 8:00PM. Sedillo’s style of workshop operates using a multi prompt structure that is as versatile as it is dynamic. His workshop will address the theme of Black and Latinx solidarity. He will ask students to answer in stanzas a series of simple but pointed questions that illuminate the content of their lives or their knowledge of grand historical sweep or their summer vacation.

Matt Sedillo is a two-time national slam poet Grand Slam Champion of the Damn Slam (Los Angeles, 2011) and author of For What I Might do Tomorrow published by Casa de Poesia in 2010. Born in El Sereno, California in 1981, Matt Sedillo writes from the vantage point of a second generation Chicano born in an era of diminishing opportunities and a crumbling economy. His writing – a fearless, challenging and at times even confrontational blend of humor, history and political theory – is a reflection of those realities. The poetry of Matt Sedillo is in turn a shot in the arm of pure revolutionary adrenaline and at others a sobering call for the fundamental restructuring of society in the interest of people not profits. Passionate, analytical, humorous and above all sincere, a revolutionary poet fortunate enough to be living in interesting times, the artistry of Matt Sedillo is a clarion call for all those who know a new world is not only possible but inevitable.​

Free parking is available in the parking garage of the Reitz Union after 4:30PM.

Be sure share our program flier!

 

 

This first episode of the Safe Spaces series spring-boards off of the controversial acceptance letter sent out this year to incoming students of the University of Chicago, and it follows a racially charged and abnormally divisive presidential election. It explores what a safe space means to different students and faculty at the University of Florida and what influences them to create those spaces on campus. We will be examining what it took to put institutes such as IBC and La Casita in place as well as the significance of Ethnic Studies programs for students of all walks of life.

This episode contains royalty-free music created by Bensound, Lee Rosevere, Arsonist and Kevin Hartnell.