Gainesville residents and UF community: there are ways to help the Immokalee community by dropping off goods at multiple on-campus locations. Items will be transported to Immokalee first on September 23, and then again in two weeks. #HurricaneIrmaRelief

A list of items includes:

  • Charcoal
  • Lighters
  • Diapers
  • Baby wipes
  • Bug spray
  • Underwear
  • Socks
  • Tarps
  • Non-perishable or canned foods
  • Feminine hygiene products

Drop-off locations and times include:

UF Graduate Assistants United Office – Yon 224 Tuesday 2-5PM and Wednesday & Thursday from 1:30 to 3:30 PM.

University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies – Grinter Hall 319, 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 1:00PM to 5:00 PM

Center for African Studies at the University of Florida (MDP Office) – Grinter 470 from 9 AM to 5 PM

La Salita in the UF J. Wayne Reitz Union UF Multicultural & Diversity Affairs from 9 AM to 7 PM

We wanted to share a sheet that the directors of the IC-Race (Immigration, Critical Race and Cultural Equity) Lab at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Drs. Nayeli Y. Chavez- Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames developed, “Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.” Please share widely with anyone who may benefit from this toolkit; the mental health of DREAMers matters.

Click here for access to this document.

September 29th from noon to 2 PM, SPOHP is hosting an Open House in the SPOHP office to welcome students and faculty alike to get acquainted with our program, staff and dozens of exciting on going projects. Visitors can expect to enjoy refreshments as they learn about SPOHP’s fieldwork, internships, and volunteer opportunities as well as our many upcoming public programs and experiential learning opportunities.

SPOHP intern Chelsey Hendry Simmons attended the Defend DACA/Save TPS Rally at Orlando City Hall. The rally was held just one hour after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the Trump Administration would be rescinding DACA, the Obama-era executive order protecting over 800,000 undocumented immigrants who entered the United States as children from deportation. The rally was one of many across the nation held in solidarity with those affected by the decision. Beneficiaries of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals executive order, recipients of Temporary Protected Status, and supporters gathered to listen to speakers discuss the threatened immigration policies. Attendees discussed the uncertain future of both programs, and encouraged all to work towards a long-term solution for over one million people currently receiving DACA and TPS.

 

 

 

 

MCDA is proud to present: Anti-Racism Education Week.
Come join us as we engage in an event series on anti-racism education, self-care, and education on the first amendment. This is a great opportunity to interact with faculty, staff, and peers on how to challenge racism and bigotry on our campus and in our community.

TUESDAY 9/5: “Café con Self-Care: An interactive Panel Discussion on how to take care of ourselves in times of crisis”
5:30-7:30pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-sponsors: GatorWell, Counseling and Wellness Center

WEDNESDAY 9/6: “Our Collective Responsibility: What can we do to challenge racism on our campus and in our community?”
5:30-7pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-Sponsors: STARR (Students Taking Action Against Racism), Student Government, UF Hillel

THURSDAY 9/7: “Origins of Totalitarianism” Lecture by Dr. Paul Ortiz and post-lecture discussion
6pm-7:30pm, Reitz Union 2201
Co-Sponsors: UF Hillel, Samuel Proctor Oral History Program

FRIDAY 9/8: “A Conversation on the First Amendment”
5pm-6:30pm, Rion Ballroom

An event by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
Co-sponsored by: Multicultural DIversity Affairs, the Bob Graham Center for Public Service, The Brechner Center for Freedom of Information, and the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations (Levin College of Law).

Print and/or share MCDA’s Anti-Racism Education Week program flier below:

“Since 2005, the Gainesville Latino Film Festival has featured hundreds of groundbreaking, highly acclaimed and thought-provoking films from Latin America. In 2017, our mission continues: to afford Gainesville the unique opportunity to see world-class cinema, innovative shorts, international award winners, and foster diverse experiences that link people
through the art of cinema- launching Gainesville as a cultural destination. This year’s amazing line-up includes films from Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Bolivia, Mexico, US, and Guatemala. Join us for Gainesville’s most thrilling movie event of the year!”

Check out the event page for the lineup on Facebook

With the help of coordinators Raja Rahim and Ryan Thompson, the Spring 2017 interns produced podcasts about Civic Engagement at the University of Florida.

University of Florida Digital Collections Archive

To date, 90+ oral history podcast pieces are available on the University of Florida’s Digital Collections website, including final projects for internship classes, as well as the original SPOHP podcast series Safe Spaces, The Gainesville 8 and Ottoman Greeks of the US. Browse the following highlights for more information, and visit the UFDC to download the many available series and student pieces.

To access information about individual episodes and pieces, scroll through the UFDC collection. Podcast pieces below are from the Spring 2017 internship class. All segment from this collection are 20 minutes or less to facilitate easy access to local history for students, teachers, and the general public.

 

Inclusion at the University of Florida (created by Ebony Love) 18:56

What kind of students, faculty, and staff members are here? If we are looking at 2016 alone, only 3,245 Black students enrolled at the University of Florida out of a headcount of 54,854 students. That means a little less than 6 percent of students at the University of Florida identify as Black, according to the Office of Institutional Planning and Research. When we expand this exploration to Black faculty members, of the 4,392 full time faculty members, only 191, or 4 percent identify as Black. Why is this a problem? According to the census, the demographics for the state of Florida show that 16.8 percent of the population is Black. In other words, the student and full time faculty demographics of UF are nowhere near being representative of the state of Florida in its numbers. The question now becomes how does the University of Florida uphold its mission of being a “diverse community” if it is not even representative of the state of Florida?

 

That Great Ol’ American Dream (created by Susan Atkinson) 19:59

Dr. Adejumo’s success stemmed from his proactive decisions in combination with the strong support of Black mentors and networks. But it is important to remember that one man’s experience does not represent the whole. Injustice towards minority groups is still prevalent in our society and at our university. We need to be aware of our history, the good and the bad. We must acknowledge past achievements and struggles and use them as footholds for progressing activism. Despite the current turmoil, Dr. Adejumo has a grand vision for the future of UF.

 

Race Relations at UF and Beyond (created by Brenda W. Stroud) 18:14

The University of Florida is listed among the top 20 colleges in the Nation. They are ranked #1 in Florida by USA Today. Still, trying to prove themselves demographically as a diverse and welcoming campus for both faculty and students, remains a challenge. I sat down with Tamarra Jenkins, Office Manager at the University’s Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, to discuss these ongoing struggles.

 

Dodged a Lot of Bullets (created by Sidney St. Cyr) 11:12

Camilo Reina-Munoz has had quite the journey that has led him to Gainesville, the center of the GatorNation. Reina Munoz’s journey started in Bogata, Colombia, due to guerilla warfare. He and his family went to Boston when he was nine months old and traveled along the East coast.

 

My Former Teaching Assistant Toye (created by Margaret Clarke) 9:33

As a student in one of Toyes classes I just assumed that he lived a life that was far more difficult then my own because he is from Nigeria and I am from America, because he walks down the street and people see a Black man while I walk down the street and no one thinks much. I assumed that he had to deal with prejudice and micro-aggresions that I could never understand and while that all this is true to Toyes experience, I underestimated his attitude and gratefulness to be here at the University of Florida.

 

A Humanity Thing (created by Peggy Dellinger) 36:52

Latino, gay, first-generation college graduate – how queerness and education influenced his decision to research and work with rural queer youth and why it’s important that academics volunteer or otherwise work with the populations they study outside academia.

 

“I’m Not A Juvenile Diliquent” (created by Hope Saunders) 13:00

Sidney has a great interest in sports and would like to go on to become a sports commentator if possible. However, he has been discouraged many times by others who claim he is not cut out to do that. Sidney compares himself to Mike Wazowski of Monsters Inc, a character who struggles to fit into career stereotypes.

 

 

The Fall 2017 Internship Application is now open!  SPOHP’s semester-long academic internship is available to graduate and undergraduate students for credit as an introduction to the field of oral history.

The Fall 2017 Social Justice Initiatives internship offers a space for students to pursue their own interests in social justice research through training and mentoring in oral history and digital humanities methodologies. Interns may develop skills in interviewing and fieldwork methods; Transcription and interview processing; Podcasting and audio editing; Social media and event promotion; Short documentaries and video editing; Public and community engagement. Final projects involve conducting one or more oral history interviews and creating digital presentation for the public.

For more information, contact the Internship Graduate Coordinator Raja Rahim. Applications are due by May 1st, 2017. Please email applications to Raja Rahim or deliver to SPOHP offices, Pugh Hall 241.

 

Beginning Thursday, March 16th, the SPOHP Radio Hour hits the airwaves DAILY at 8:00 a.m. on WUBA 88.1 FM.

Drawing from the 7,500+ interviews in the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program archive at the University of Florida, the SPOHP Radio Hour will air daily at 8 am on WUBA 88.1 FM with fascinating stories on people from all walks of life, and places and events both famous as well as hitherto hidden from history!

This week’s first installment of the SPOHP Radio Hour show explores what a “safe space” means to diverse groups of students and faculty at the University of Florida, and what influences them to create those spaces on campus. We’ll be examining what it took to create the Institute of Hispanic-Latino culture and the Institute of Black Culture at the University of Florida as well as the significance of Ethnic Studies programs today for students, staff, faculty and the public in general.

Click here to stream WUBA 88.1 FM live!

WUBA 88.1 FM is a wonderful, community-based radio station located in High Springs, Florida and covering Alachua, Gainesville, Jones, Lake City, Fort White, and soon to expand!

Enjoy the SPOHP Radio Hour at 8:00 a.m, on WUBA 88.1 FM starting this Thursday!

Please help us promote people’s stories from the Proctor Program archive by sharing this Facebook announcement link on your Scoial media outlets

Thank You!