From Colored to Black: The Stories of North Central Florida

We will be sharing nine dramatic vignettes created by our students and performed by members of the local theatre community with our performance, “From Colored to Black: The Stories of North Central Florida,” at the Harn Museum of Art‘s Museum Nights this Thursday night! The performance, a partnership with Actors’ Warehouse, Inc., will take place 6:00-7:00PM in “The Prints of Jacob Lawrence” exhibit at the Harn!

Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF

Event: Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF
Date: Friday, March 30, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: Pugh Hall – Ocora
Join us for a discussion on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and the Institute of Hispanic/Latino Cultures (La Casita), including their founding and their entwined legacies. Speakers will include Dr. David Horne (Cal State Northridge), one of the organizers of the Black Thursday protest that led to the founding of the IBC, and Dr. Maria Masque, former La Casita director (1995-1997) who actively supported efforts for awareness and engagement among the University student groups of color. Not a formal panel discussion, this is intended to be an open dialogue between these speakers and the UF community.

Trinidad Study Abroad Registration Deadline Extended – March 30

There is a registration deadline extension for our summer study abroad course in the historic and scenic Trinidad & Tobago. If interested please apply at: International Center (University of Florida International Center UFIC) by Friday, March 30th. Check out the program and course offerings, and join us in Trinidad & Tobago!

“Voices of Dreamers” Students fundraising for SOHA Conference in LA

Since launching the “Voices of Dreamers” project to conduct interviews with undocumented students, our students are now fundraising to share their research at the Southwestern Oral History Conference at Cal State Fullerton this April.

“Voices From The March” Students Fundraise to Perform at SOHA Conference

https://vimeo.com/254959350

After headlining the 2018 UF Social Justice Summit this past January Voices from the March will be traveling to California this April to perform at the Southwest Oral History Association Annual Conference, hosted at California State University, Fullerton!

Please help us raise money to assist in covering the travel and lodging costs for our cast. We have been working so hard to bring this project to life, but we still need your support to share our work. Any donation is greatly appreciated!

Donate here!

The play is primarily based on interviews collected during last year’s presidential inauguration and the Women’s March on Washington, as well as the experiences of UF students who lead this project.  Our cast features some of the students who traveled to Washington, D.C., performing alongside other students who assist in bringing their various interviews to life. But, like our wonderful director Jeffrey Pufahl has said, “This is more than taking a play to LA, it’s about students defining who they are to the world!”

Donating to this fundraiser means that you are not only supporting this play, but you are also supporting student research and activism that is desperately needed in today’s world. This play empowers students to embrace their experiences, to use their voices in telling stories that need to be heard, and to engage in action and activism through the arts.

Our cast members hail from different corners of the UF community with varying degrees of experience performing in live theatre, making this trip to LA all the more special!

Interested in learning more about our play? Check out this article!  Watch this video! ‌

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Applications Open for our Fall 2018 Internship!

There have always been women, people of color, and queer folks in punk rock, both in the U.S. and throughout the wider world. Punks from countries as varied as Peru, Spain, Indonesia, Russia, and beyond have braved incarceration, religious re-education camps, and even forced disappearances in honoring the lifestyle and artistic expression that they have created spaces for through the punk scene. Punk is global, complex, and diverse.

This internship focuses on how and why people create these spaces. We will publicly archive oral history interviews to allow people of color, women, and queer punks to describe their experiences in their own words and voices. What kinds of spaces for resistance and social justice can people create when they overtly reject social norms?

SPOHP Intern Opportunities:

  • Interviewing and fieldwork methods and theory
  • Transcription and interview processing
  • Podcasting and audio editing
  • Social media and public event promotion
  • Short documentaries and video editing
  • Public and community engagement and theory

Applications are due April 16, 2018

Fall 2018 SPOHP Internship Application

For more information check out Oral history internship program, contact Associate Program Director Ryan Morini, or visit us at the SPOHP offices in Pugh Hall 247

 

Safe Spaces: Episode 3 – “Miracle On 13th Street”

In this latest episode of our podcast series Safe Spaces, Anupa Kotipoyna looks back at the creation of the India Cultural and Education Center (ICEC) in Gainesville, Florida.

Art of Aging

In the summer of 2017 SPOHP partnered with UF College of Medicine, to develop an oral history segment for the Geriatrics Medicine Clerkship, a required rotation for all 4th year medical students that Dr. Otto directs. SPOHP’s Ryan Thompson took on leadership for its half of the partnership. This marked the beginning of another significant partnership for SPOHP, one of many individual and organizational collaborations over the program’s half-century existence. Collaborations like these have proven mutually beneficial for SPOHP and its partners in professional and academic fields and beyond.

Now on UFDC: “Keep Your Trash” (1971) First Documentary on Memphis Sanitation Worker’s Strike

“Keep Your Trash” 1971 Documentary on Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike Newly Released for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebrations on UF Digital Collections

Gainesville, FL—Award-winning PBS documentarian Churchill Roberts was a doctoral student at the University of Iowa in 1971 when he produced the first documentary film recounting events of the historic 1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers strike and assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Four decades after its original release, “Keep Your Trash” is now newly digitized and available on the UF Digital Collections through the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and George A. Smathers Libraries.

Roberts became personally involved with the strike when he began working with a group called Memphis Search for Meaning Committee as a young graduate student, collecting footage and interviews about the strike shortly after Dr. King’s death.

In subsequent years, Churchill Roberts became an award-winning film maker and a prominent professor in the College of Journalism at the University of Florida. His films include, “Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore” (2001), and “Negroes With Guns: Rob Williams and Black Power” (2006).

Thinking back over four decades after the making of “Keep Your Trash,” Professor Roberts recalls:

“The events in Memphis changed my life completely. Before attending Iowa, I had taught communication for a year in a vocational program funded by the Manpower Development Training Act, an act of Congress to help people at the bottom of the economic ladder, particularly minorities, develop job skills. Teaching in the vocational program made me realize how unfair society had been to the less privileged. Dr. King’s assassination brought a sense of urgency to the problem.

 

At Iowa, I took a course on race relations and focused my early research on the portrayal of minorities on television. Later, I had an opportunity to make several PBS documentaries about unsung heroes of the civil rights era.”

To commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Roberts released a copy of “Keep Your Trash” to the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program for educational use, and the film is now available to the public through the generous support of George A. Smathers Libraries.

UF’s 2018 celebrations of Martin Luther King Day are organized by the Multicultural & Diversity Affairs program.

For more information about “Keep Your Trash” and additional oral histories of the civil rights movement, please contact the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida.

 

NAFTA’s Long Shadow: Where immigration and economic policy meet

SPOHP alumna and longtime research collaborator Dr. Sarah McNamara was published on Public Seminar with an essay titled, “NAFTA’s Long Shadow Where immigration and economic policy meet.” Sarah is a professor and historian at Texas A & M University whose work centers on Latinx, women and gender, and labor in the modern United States. Read a sample of her essay below:

“Congressional Democrats and Republicans regularly play the blame game about why there’s no immigration reform. But each party fails to point the finger at one of the major culprits behind the contemporary immigration waves and this political morass: NAFTA.

The signing of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) in the 1990s linked Canada, the U.S., and Mexico in an economic partnership that benefited corporations and the U.S. economy but had profound human consequences. One result of this policy was the migration of women and men to the U.S. from Mexico and the precarious status many undocumented youth and their families live with today.

The Trump administration’s decision to rescind DACA prior to the passage of the DREAM Act was unethical because it overlooked the connection between the presence of undocumented youth and multinational free-trade policies. DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) existed because Congress repeatedly failed to pass the Development Relief for Alien Minors Act, commonly known as the DREAM Act, between 2001 and 2012. While the DREAM Act is a bipartisan bill with bipartisan support that would lead to permanent residency for undocumented youth, DACA was an executive action signed by Obama that granted temporary legal status and work permits to undocumented youth in exchange for registering with Homeland Security and going through a stringent vetting process. These “dreamers” and their families live in the United States due to, in part, economic choices the United States has made.”

Read the full Public Seminar article here now!

Dr. McNamara is currenty at work on her first book, tentatively titled, “From Picket Lines to Picket Fences: Latinas and the Remaking of the Jim Crow South.” Her manuscript traces the transformation of Latina/o politics and culture between the Great Depression and the civil rights movement in Florida by examining the choices immigrant Cuban and later American-born Latinas made to achieve political representation and social justice for themselves and their community. Her work has received support from the American Historical Association, the Tulane Center for the Gulf South, the American Libraries Association, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.