Our students just got back from another successful and exciting trip doing oral history fieldwork in the Mississippi Delta as part of our Mississippi Freedom Project!

The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi.

As we work diligently on our documentary project on the history of Institute of Black Culture and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Affairs, today we commemorate the one-year anniversary of Black and Brown Wednesday, a historical moment at the University of Florida.

On July 12, 2017, No La IBCita and their supporters, protested the proposal made by the Multicultural and Diversity Affairs Department (MCDA), to structurally merge the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Cultures (IHLC), La Casita, into one building. Black and Brown Wednesday is in the spirit of the continued resistance as demonstrated by people’s movements like the national Black Campus Movements, and movements that build from that legacy.

The efforts of the No La IBCita Movement produced gains, one of which led to stopping the merging of the buildings, and in turn, stopped an action that would have resulted in the erasure of history, and the homogenization of culture. However, the movement was also successful in that it has created a lasting impact and the opportunity to continue to build from these efforts. Stay tuned this week, as we commemorate NoLaIBCita’s anniversary of Freedom Friday on July 20th, by highlighting the harvests and lasting contributions that have resulted from the movement!

Posted by Chad Adonis on Wednesday, July 12, 2017

SPOHP Undergraduate Research Coordinator Oliver Tesluma and undergraduate Political Science major, as well as SPOHP alums Assistant Professor Jessica Taylor of Virginia Tech and George Washington University doctoral student Candice Ellis, presented papers at the 8th National Civil Rights Conference, which took place on June 17-20, 2018 in Meridian and Philadelphia, Mississippi. This year’s conference theme was “Lets Rise, Advocate, Educate and Cooperate.” Their papers were presented during a panel presentation entitled, Recording Civil Rights History: the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) and the Mississippi Freedom Project.

Telsuma’s paper, “Evaluating the Effects of Oral History and Civil Rights Activism in the Mississippi Delta Since the 1950s,” incorporated research methods he learned while working with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, which, he notes, “emphasizes community collaboration and decolonized leadership structures to conduct effective and sustainable research.” Telsuma’s scholarship contextualizes information collected from the Mississippi Delta region, while evaluating elements of these research methods as organizing tools for better understanding the ways in which power structures can work alongside marginalized communities to empower them, from the Freedom Summer to the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Event: Tale of Two Houses: A Dialogue on Black and Latinx History at UF
Date: Friday, March 30, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Location: Pugh Hall – Ocora
Join us for a discussion on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and the Institute of Hispanic/Latino Cultures (La Casita), including their founding and their entwined legacies. Speakers will include Dr. David Horne (Cal State Northridge), one of the organizers of the Black Thursday protest that led to the founding of the IBC, and Dr. Maria Masque, former La Casita director (1995-1997) who actively supported efforts for awareness and engagement among the University student groups of color. Not a formal panel discussion, this is intended to be an open dialogue between these speakers and the UF community.

SPOHP alumna and longtime research collaborator Dr. Sarah McNamara was published on Public Seminar with an essay titled, “NAFTA’s Long Shadow Where immigration and economic policy meet.” Sarah is a professor and historian at Texas A & M University whose work centers on Latinx, women and gender, and labor in the modern United States. Read a sample of her essay below:

“Congressional Democrats and Republicans regularly play the blame game about why there’s no immigration reform. But each party fails to point the finger at one of the major culprits behind the contemporary immigration waves and this political morass: NAFTA.

The signing of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) in the 1990s linked Canada, the U.S., and Mexico in an economic partnership that benefited corporations and the U.S. economy but had profound human consequences. One result of this policy was the migration of women and men to the U.S. from Mexico and the precarious status many undocumented youth and their families live with today.

The Trump administration’s decision to rescind DACA prior to the passage of the DREAM Act was unethical because it overlooked the connection between the presence of undocumented youth and multinational free-trade policies. DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) existed because Congress repeatedly failed to pass the Development Relief for Alien Minors Act, commonly known as the DREAM Act, between 2001 and 2012. While the DREAM Act is a bipartisan bill with bipartisan support that would lead to permanent residency for undocumented youth, DACA was an executive action signed by Obama that granted temporary legal status and work permits to undocumented youth in exchange for registering with Homeland Security and going through a stringent vetting process. These “dreamers” and their families live in the United States due to, in part, economic choices the United States has made.”

Read the full Public Seminar article here now!

Dr. McNamara is currenty at work on her first book, tentatively titled, “From Picket Lines to Picket Fences: Latinas and the Remaking of the Jim Crow South.” Her manuscript traces the transformation of Latina/o politics and culture between the Great Depression and the civil rights movement in Florida by examining the choices immigrant Cuban and later American-born Latinas made to achieve political representation and social justice for themselves and their community. Her work has received support from the American Historical Association, the Tulane Center for the Gulf South, the American Libraries Association, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Dear Friends of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program,

As you will read in this exciting end-of- year progress report, SPOHP has reached more students, scholars, and members of the general public than ever. We have conducted community-based oral history workshops with churches, businesses, university classes, veteran’s groups, African American history museums, Native American nations and much more. Thanks in large part to your generosity we have been able to provide logistical support for social-justice research projects throughout the Americas and we provided transformative and life-changing educational opportunities for hundreds of students.

In the summer of 2017 we embarked upon our 10th annual field work trip to the Mississippi Delta. In addition to interviewing legendary civil rights organizers, our team performed a day of service at the Emmett Till Museum in Glendora and sponsored public educational forums on bringing civil rights education to K-12 students in Mississippi and the South generally. Teaching students how to learn outside of the classroom is one of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s specialties. From the moment when our founder Dr. Samuel Proctor trained a cohort of graduate students to conduct oral history interviews with Native Americans in Florida, North Carolina and Alabama in the early 1970s, SPOHP’s mission has been to promote experiential learning, civic engagement, and history outside of the box—and outside of the campus. In an era of “fake news” we train interns how to conduct rigorous research. In a time of polarized debates, we show students how to listen carefully—especially to people who share diverse opinions—and we engage students in learning the age-old art of conversation. When we return from the field, we teach students the art of digital video and audio production which gives them the ability to create podcasts and documentaries on important social issues that have gained broad audiences.

Of course, none of this is possible without your support. If you like what you read in this newsletter, I hope that you will join me in helping us celebrate the 50 th year of SPOHP by making a tax-deductible donation to help sustain the work of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. In addition, if you have a friend or family member who may be so inclined, please pass this newsletter along to them. Finally, I hope that you will visit or phone us sometime in the New Year. Our students, staff and volunteers treasure the opportunity to personally share their experiences with members of the Proctor Program Family! Thank you as always for your consideration and your support.

 

Sincerely Yours,

 

Paul Ortiz

Check out our year-end journal here. 

 

 

 

AFA 4931: A BLACK AND LATINXHISTORY OF THE GATOR NATION

This upcoming Spring, the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program is offering a oral history methods course course called Black and Latinx History of the Gator Nation.

Students enrolled in this course in Spring 2018 (MWF 5th) will create new archives on Black and Latinx history at UF, focusing on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture and La Casita.

In this course, students will:

  • Critically examine the history of UF as it is currently written.
  • Uncover overlooked stories in hundreds of existing interviews.
  • Apply oral history interview methods with alumni, faculty, staff.
  • Identify existing archival resources on these topics.
  • Collect and/or digitize new archival materials (photos, letters).
  • Help create a roadmap for future students to advance this work.
  • Create podcasts and teaching modules to share these stories.
  • Assist in the creation of documentaries on IBC and La Casita.

For more information on AFA 4931, section 0587,contact Dr. Ryan Morini ,
Dr. Paul Ortízat , or visit us in the SPOHP office at 248 Pugh Hall

We wanted to share a sheet that the directors of the IC-Race (Immigration, Critical Race and Cultural Equity) Lab at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Drs. Nayeli Y. Chavez- Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames developed, “Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.” Please share widely with anyone who may benefit from this toolkit; the mental health of DREAMers matters.

Click here for access to this document.

September 29th from noon to 2 PM, SPOHP is hosting an Open House in the SPOHP office to welcome students and faculty alike to get acquainted with our program, staff and dozens of exciting on going projects. Visitors can expect to enjoy refreshments as they learn about SPOHP’s fieldwork, internships, and volunteer opportunities as well as our many upcoming public programs and experiential learning opportunities.