The OHA’s Day of Giving last year raised money for scholarships to fund travel to the Annual OHA Conference for those in hurricane-affected areas. With matching funds provided by the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida, the OHA was able to fund 2 scholarships for travel expenses to the OHA Conference in Montreal, October 10-14. Please see the call below. Deadline to submit: September 15, 2018

Call for Applications:

The Oral History Association announces two travel scholarships for Oral Historians from Areas Affected by Hurricanes in 2017 to attend the OHA Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018.

In response to the devastation wrought by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, the Oral History Association, the Chao Center for Asian Studies at Rice University and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are pleased to announce two $2500 travel awards to those living or working in these affected areas for travel to the Oral History Association Conference in Montreal, Canada, October 10-14, 2018. All travel costs to the conference will be reimbursable up to that $2500 mark.

Applications must include a letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work and a letter of support for the application.

For award purposes, we define those affected by these hurricanes to include any area damaged by high water (either from rain or from opening up reservoirs), be they individual structures, waterways, streets, or entire neighborhoods. We are looking to fund people whose particular projects fits into a more comprehensive attempt at recording or researching any of these catastrophic hurricanes.

Apply here!

Applications are due on September 15, 2018, and winners will be announced by September 30, 2018.  To submit an application: Please include a one-page letter explaining the applicant’s oral history work, and a letter of support for the application. Please combine your entire application into ONE PDF document and email it by September 15, 2018. 

September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Pugh Hall – Ocora

296 Buckman Drive, Gainesville FL 32611

Watch on Streaming and On Demand link at:

Mediasite website

Welcoming Gainesville and Alachua County and the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida are holding a public event titled “Home Away from Home: Remembering Refugees in Florida” on September 20, 2018 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm at Pugh Hall Ocora (296 Buckman Drive Gainesville FL 32611). The event will feature the oral history of refugees in Jacksonville, Florida, collected by Seyeon Hwang, a doctoral student in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Florida, and various state-wide and national efforts in refugee advocacy, followed by a talk-back session with refugees and refugee resettlement professionals from Florida.

This event is supported by the Florida Humanities Council and the public is encouraged to attend the event. Light refreshment will be served.

For more information on the oral history project in Jacksonville or the event, please visit contact Grace Chun or visit Refugee oral history website.

Visit our Eventbrite page.

This event is free and open to the public.

Our students just got back from another successful and exciting trip doing oral history fieldwork in the Mississippi Delta as part of our Mississippi Freedom Project!

The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi.

As we work diligently on our documentary project on the history of Institute of Black Culture and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Affairs, today we commemorate the one-year anniversary of Black and Brown Wednesday, a historical moment at the University of Florida.

On July 12, 2017, No La IBCita and their supporters, protested the proposal made by the Multicultural and Diversity Affairs Department (MCDA), to structurally merge the Institute of Black Culture (IBC) and Institute of Hispanic and Latino Cultures (IHLC), La Casita, into one building. Black and Brown Wednesday is in the spirit of the continued resistance as demonstrated by people’s movements like the national Black Campus Movements, and movements that build from that legacy.

The efforts of the No La IBCita Movement produced gains, one of which led to stopping the merging of the buildings, and in turn, stopped an action that would have resulted in the erasure of history, and the homogenization of culture. However, the movement was also successful in that it has created a lasting impact and the opportunity to continue to build from these efforts. Stay tuned this week, as we commemorate NoLaIBCita’s anniversary of Freedom Friday on July 20th, by highlighting the harvests and lasting contributions that have resulted from the movement!

Posted by Chad Adonis on Wednesday, July 12, 2017

SPOHP Undergraduate Research Coordinator Oliver Tesluma and undergraduate Political Science major, as well as SPOHP alums Assistant Professor Jessica Taylor of Virginia Tech and George Washington University doctoral student Candice Ellis, presented papers at the 8th National Civil Rights Conference, which took place on June 17-20, 2018 in Meridian and Philadelphia, Mississippi. This year’s conference theme was “Lets Rise, Advocate, Educate and Cooperate.” Their papers were presented during a panel presentation entitled, Recording Civil Rights History: the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) and the Mississippi Freedom Project.

Telsuma’s paper, “Evaluating the Effects of Oral History and Civil Rights Activism in the Mississippi Delta Since the 1950s,” incorporated research methods he learned while working with the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, which, he notes, “emphasizes community collaboration and decolonized leadership structures to conduct effective and sustainable research.” Telsuma’s scholarship contextualizes information collected from the Mississippi Delta region, while evaluating elements of these research methods as organizing tools for better understanding the ways in which power structures can work alongside marginalized communities to empower them, from the Freedom Summer to the Black Lives Matter Movement.

We will be continuing our Mississippi Freedom Project this Summer to travel to the Mississippi Delta for our annual fieldwork trip July 15th – 22nd. The Mississippi Freedom Project (MFP) is an award-winning archive of 200+ oral history interviews conducted with veterans of the civil rights movement and notable residents of the Mississippi Delta. The collection centers on activism and organizing in partnership with the Sunflower County Civil Rights Organization in Sunflower, Mississippi. This year, students participating in our fieldwork trip will engage in the following projects:

  • Conducting interviews in Gadsden County and Tallahassee
  • Conducting interviews with Equal Justice Initiative Staff
  • Tour Legacy Museum & Lynching Memorial
  • Conducting interviews at the Southern Poverty Law Center
  • Day of Service at Colored Cemetery
  • Participating in a Civil Rights Panel

For more information about the trip, check out, http://oral.history.ufl.edu/projects/mfp/ or contact the project coordinator, Nicole Yapp, at nyapp@ufl.edu.

Fieldwork Goals:

  • Conduct oral history fieldwork with community members and former civil rights activists
  • Engage in scholarship about grassroots freedom movements
  • Involvement in a public panel
  • Participate in service day activities with community organizations

Summer B 2018, July 2 – August 10
AMH 3593: Introduction to Oral History

Course Overview

This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of oral history. Oral history is an important methodological approach to documenting the past which allows historians to engage directly with narrators who share their life experiences touching on any number of themes and topics. It is an easily accessible form of history in which practically anyone can take part as either an interviewer or interviewee. Oral history projects often involve making connections with community organizations which allows for the forging of stronger connections between academia and Main Street. Accordingly, one of the biggest strengths of oral history as a methodological approach to studying the past is its public component-oral histories are often collected in a community and then shared with that community.

For our research project this summer we will be partnering with the Farmworkers’ Association of Florida (FWAF), an organization which advocates on behalf of agricultural workers in central Florida. We will be interviewing current and former farmworkers. Conducting these oral history interviews will give us the opportunity to interrogate the lived experiences of these men and women and to better understand what it means to be a worker in the agricultural industry and to understand the intersection of class, race/ethnicity, and gender in this work environment. Through these interviews we will also explores issues of environmental sustainability and the impact of pesticides and genetically modified crops on humans and the environment.

Course Goals:

  • Build foundational knowledge of oral history methodology and research use
  • Work on oral history interview processing
  • Conduct an original oral history interview
  • Gain Digital Archives & Humanities experience
  • Learn skills in different forms of visual media, podcasting and design software

 

Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. For more information contact Matt Simmons.