Art of Aging

In the summer of 2017 SPOHP partnered with UF College of Medicine, to develop an oral history segment for the Geriatrics Medicine Clerkship, a required rotation for all 4th year medical students that Dr. Otto directs. SPOHP’s Ryan Thompson took on leadership for its half of the partnership. This marked the beginning of another significant partnership for SPOHP, one of many individual and organizational collaborations over the program’s half-century existence. Collaborations like these have proven mutually beneficial for SPOHP and its partners in professional and academic fields and beyond.

Now on UFDC: “Keep Your Trash” (1971) First Documentary on Memphis Sanitation Worker’s Strike

“Keep Your Trash” 1971 Documentary on Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike Newly Released for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebrations on UF Digital Collections

Gainesville, FL—Award-winning PBS documentarian Churchill Roberts was a doctoral student at the University of Iowa in 1971 when he produced the first documentary film recounting events of the historic 1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers strike and assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Four decades after its original release, “Keep Your Trash” is now newly digitized and available on the UF Digital Collections through the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and George A. Smathers Libraries.

Roberts became personally involved with the strike when he began working with a group called Memphis Search for Meaning Committee as a young graduate student, collecting footage and interviews about the strike shortly after Dr. King’s death.

In subsequent years, Churchill Roberts became an award-winning film maker and a prominent professor in the College of Journalism at the University of Florida. His films include, “Freedom Never Dies: The Legacy of Harry T. Moore” (2001), and “Negroes With Guns: Rob Williams and Black Power” (2006).

Thinking back over four decades after the making of “Keep Your Trash,” Professor Roberts recalls:

“The events in Memphis changed my life completely. Before attending Iowa, I had taught communication for a year in a vocational program funded by the Manpower Development Training Act, an act of Congress to help people at the bottom of the economic ladder, particularly minorities, develop job skills. Teaching in the vocational program made me realize how unfair society had been to the less privileged. Dr. King’s assassination brought a sense of urgency to the problem.

 

At Iowa, I took a course on race relations and focused my early research on the portrayal of minorities on television. Later, I had an opportunity to make several PBS documentaries about unsung heroes of the civil rights era.”

To commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Roberts released a copy of “Keep Your Trash” to the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program for educational use, and the film is now available to the public through the generous support of George A. Smathers Libraries.

UF’s 2018 celebrations of Martin Luther King Day are organized by the Multicultural & Diversity Affairs program.

For more information about “Keep Your Trash” and additional oral histories of the civil rights movement, please contact the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida.

 

Our Year-End Journal is Available Now

Dear Friends of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program,

As you will read in this exciting end-of- year progress report, SPOHP has reached more students, scholars, and members of the general public than ever. We have conducted community-based oral history workshops with churches, businesses, university classes, veteran’s groups, African American history museums, Native American nations and much more. Thanks in large part to your generosity we have been able to provide logistical support for social-justice research projects throughout the Americas and we provided transformative and life-changing educational opportunities for hundreds of students.

In the summer of 2017 we embarked upon our 10th annual field work trip to the Mississippi Delta. In addition to interviewing legendary civil rights organizers, our team performed a day of service at the Emmett Till Museum in Glendora and sponsored public educational forums on bringing civil rights education to K-12 students in Mississippi and the South generally. Teaching students how to learn outside of the classroom is one of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s specialties. From the moment when our founder Dr. Samuel Proctor trained a cohort of graduate students to conduct oral history interviews with Native Americans in Florida, North Carolina and Alabama in the early 1970s, SPOHP’s mission has been to promote experiential learning, civic engagement, and history outside of the box—and outside of the campus. In an era of “fake news” we train interns how to conduct rigorous research. In a time of polarized debates, we show students how to listen carefully—especially to people who share diverse opinions—and we engage students in learning the age-old art of conversation. When we return from the field, we teach students the art of digital video and audio production which gives them the ability to create podcasts and documentaries on important social issues that have gained broad audiences.

Of course, none of this is possible without your support. If you like what you read in this newsletter, I hope that you will join me in helping us celebrate the 50 th year of SPOHP by making a tax-deductible donation to help sustain the work of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. In addition, if you have a friend or family member who may be so inclined, please pass this newsletter along to them. Finally, I hope that you will visit or phone us sometime in the New Year. Our students, staff and volunteers treasure the opportunity to personally share their experiences with members of the Proctor Program Family! Thank you as always for your consideration and your support.

 

Sincerely Yours,

 

Paul Ortiz

Check out our year-end journal here. 

 

 

 

Telling Gainesville: A Film Screening

Please join military veterans and their families for a special Veterans Day film screening of the play “Telling Gainesville.” Telling Gainesville is part of a nationwide initiative by the National Endowment for the Humanities that connects civilian audiences with veterans in a creative, supportive environment.

“Telling Gainesville” ran to standing-room- only audiences at the Actor’s Warehouse in the fall of 2016. It featured veterans from the Marine Corps, the US Navy, and the Army—along with a woman who was married to an Air Force pilot for twenty years. The play allowed veterans tell their stories in the first person, and to speak directly with audiences about the challenges of military service in war and in peace.

The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program’s videographer, Deborah Hendrix, filmed one of the final performances of Telling Gainesville. The film captures the poignancy of veterans discussing combat experiences, loss of comrades, and post-war traumas. After the film screening, the play’s director, Jeffrey Pufahl, will hold a roundtable discussion with actor-veterans who will take questions from the audience. Jeffrey Pufahl is a Creative Campus Visiting Scholar in Residence at the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program and a faculty member in UF’s Center for Arts in Medicine.

This screening is part of ongoing efforts by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Florida Humanities Council to create and support works that bring together civilians and veterans in mutually supportive dialogues to promote understanding. The play was written by Max Reyneard and directed by Jeffrey Pufahl.

The program is part of the University of Florida’s, “Dialogues on the Experiences of War” and is sponsored by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) Veterans’ History Project and the Center for European Studies, along with the UF Center for Arts in Medicine.

This program has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as the Florida
Humanities Council.

EVENT: Telling Gainesville: Military Veterans Share Their Stories of Service and Struggle
LOCATION: The Hippodrome State Theatre, Downtown, Gainesville
DATE: Saturday, November 11th
TIME: Doors 6:30, Screening 7:00pm – 9:00pm.

Free Public Event

 

About the Dialogues on the Experience of War program:

The NEH offers the Dialogues on the Experience of War program as part of its current initiative, Standing Together: The Humanities and the Experience of War. The program supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. If you are interested in future discussion sessions or film screenings, contact Lisa Booth at the UF Center for European Studies.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Lisa Booth
Center for European Studies
Email Lisa Booth for more information and free discussion materials.

Tamarra Jenkins
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program
352-392- 7168

Black and Latinx History of the Gator Nation: Spring 2018 Course

AFA 4931: A BLACK AND LATINXHISTORY OF THE GATOR NATION

This upcoming Spring, the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program is offering a oral history methods course course called Black and Latinx History of the Gator Nation.

Students enrolled in this course in Spring 2018 (MWF 5th) will create new archives on Black and Latinx history at UF, focusing on the histories of the Institute of Black Culture and La Casita.

In this course, students will:

  • Critically examine the history of UF as it is currently written.
  • Uncover overlooked stories in hundreds of existing interviews.
  • Apply oral history interview methods with alumni, faculty, staff.
  • Identify existing archival resources on these topics.
  • Collect and/or digitize new archival materials (photos, letters).
  • Help create a roadmap for future students to advance this work.
  • Create podcasts and teaching modules to share these stories.
  • Assist in the creation of documentaries on IBC and La Casita.

For more information on AFA 4931, section 0587,contact Dr. Ryan Morini ,
Dr. Paul Ortízat , or visit us in the SPOHP office at 248 Pugh Hall

SPOHP is Seeking Out Undocumented UF Students for an Oral History Project

SPOHP is looking for undocumented UF students to be interviewed for an oral history project. Please share with anyone who might be interested in participating.

For more information direct message us or email:
Mariana Castro
or
Dr. Ryan Morini
or
Visit SPOHP on the 2nd Floor of Pugh Hall.

Mississippi Freedom Fieldwork Panel Sept. 27

Mississippi Freedom Fieldwork Panel Presentation

Ustler Hall

Wednesday, Sept. 27th

3:00 PM

On Wednesday the 27th the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program will host a panel of students to discuss their experience interviewing in Mississippi. This panel celebrates SPOHP’s 10th year of sending students out to the Mississippi Delta region to interview those involved in the Black freedom struggle and the Civil Rights movement. Students interviewed people as diverse as a leader of a hot rod club that secretly helped people escape from the KKK, Congressman John Lewis, and the first Black nurse practitioner in Mississippi. They also met with the descendants of plantation aristocracy who are going to allow UF to scan their family’s slave ledger that they have never shown before.

The event will also be live-streamed via our Facebook page.
This event is free and open to the public. Bring a friend or tune in!

“Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.”

We wanted to share a sheet that the directors of the IC-Race (Immigration, Critical Race and Cultural Equity) Lab at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Drs. Nayeli Y. Chavez- Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames developed, “Surviving & Resisting: Defending DACA A Toolkit For DREAMers.” Please share widely with anyone who may benefit from this toolkit; the mental health of DREAMers matters.

Click here for access to this document.

SPOHP Open House Scheduled for Sept. 29

September 29th from noon to 2 PM, SPOHP is hosting an Open House in the SPOHP office to welcome students and faculty alike to get acquainted with our program, staff and dozens of exciting on going projects. Visitors can expect to enjoy refreshments as they learn about SPOHP’s fieldwork, internships, and volunteer opportunities as well as our many upcoming public programs and experiential learning opportunities.

2017 Virginia Fieldwork Trip Applications Are Open!

For the past three years, a team of student researchers has traveled with SPOHP to the Tidewater region of Virginia to gather over 150 oral histories from watermen, veterans, and other residents of the region to document and preserve the traditions and culture of this once isolated part of the country. We have collaborated with local churches, historical societies, and foundations to establish a lasting relationship with the communities that we engage. Students should expect to encounter topics such as the fishing industry in the Chesapeake, environmental preservation, historic preservation, traditional crafts, civil rights, ghost stories, foodways, Native American history, colonial history, and more! If any of these sound interesting to you, feel free to apply!

Applications are due Friday, Sept. 15th.

Things to Expect:

  • Conduct anywhere from two to four individual/group interviews
  • Participate in a dig at a historical site with a professional archaeological team
  • Visit one of the many historically significant sites in the area (Jamestown, Yorktown,
    Williamsburg, etc.)

Trip Requirements:

  • Attend an informational meeting and a trip orientation (to be determined!)
  • Review provided readings prior to the trip
  • Conduct fieldwork in Mathews County and Lancaster County, Virginia
  • Submit a one-page reflection on the trip within one month of the trip’s conclusion

Information for students with disabilities:

The University of Florida is committed to providing academic accommodations for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities requesting accommodations should first register with the Disability Resource Center (352-392- 8565) by providing appropriate documentation. Once registered, students should present their accommodation letter to the internship coordinator supporting a request for accommodations. The University encourages students with disabilities to follow these procedures as early as possible within the semester.

We realize that many students will have to miss a few days of classes in order to attend this trip. With this in mind we are willing to provide an official letter from our program excusing you from class. We also can provide ample time to students during the trip (if needed) to study or complete any assignments they may have due. We strive to ensure that this trip will supplement each student’s college experience and not negatively impact their semester. If you have any questions or concerns about this or anything else concerning the trip, contact Patrick Daglaris.

Please email application to Patrick Daglaris or return the application to 243 Pugh
Hall.

Download the application below!

Virginia application 2017